Author: Patty Lee


Patrick and Anne Visit Meadowood

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Anne and Patrick with their son Max.

Heritage Foods USA and Heritage Radio Network founder Patrick Martins has the privilege of being married to Anne Saxelby of Saxelby Cheesemongers. This partnership has resulted in project like No Goat Left Behind that create bridges through the food world and help us build a more sustainable system.

 

Last weekend Patrick and Anne traveled to Meadowood Farms with their family. Below is Anne’s account of their trip:

 

 

By Anne Saxelby

 

This past weekend, we mongers packed it into the old cheese wagon and headed up to Meadowood Farms in Cazenovia, New York for a sheep-tastic cheese-filled visit!

Meadowood Farms has been around since the early 1900’s; its original owners the Chard family (no agricultural pun intended) wanted to make it a ‘scientific, sustainable model farm’. More than a century later this vision has come full circle. The farm raises Belted Galloway cattle for beef and East Fresian sheep for meat and milk on just over 200 acres of farmland overlooking beautiful Cazenovia lake.

Cheesemaker Veronica Pedraza transforms the milk into a delicious array of cheeses all bearing monikers of local roads and landmarks. Ledyard, Rippleton, Lorenzo, and Ten Eyck (the cheeses) can all be found within a few miles distance of the farm. In fact, driving around was kind of like a cheese scavenger hunt… spotting the signs on the side of the road that corresponded to each cheese became a game like the old slug bug one, minus the punching (there were three adults, one baby and two dogs in the car, so that could have gotten ugly real fast…)

The cheeses are sublime… They are made starting in early spring and finished by mid-fall when the sheep are dried off for the winter months. Stop by the shop for a taste today or order our special ‘Cheesemongers Choice’ selection featuring Meadowood Farms cheeses.

 

It’s Heritage Turkey Time!

 

Narragansett Turkeys at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch
Narragansett Turkeys at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch

It’s Heritage Turkey Time! Over the past decade, Heritage Foods USA has been a leader in the food revolution in the United States. Selling Heritage Breed Turkeys is just one aspect of our work in supporting American agriculture in the form of traditional family farms, and careful stewardship of our national resources. Nothing exemplifies the spirit of our commitment more than our Heritage birds for Thanksgiving.

We want all our customers to celebrate Thanksgiving with us. We at Heritage have much to be grateful for. With the ongoing support of our customer base, we are able sustain 40 family farms, with more being added every month. We have helped to preserve an area roughly the size of Manhattan for traditional agriculture!

Our turkeys are produced by Frank Reese and his team at Good Shepherd. Frank essentially introduced a gastronomic meaning to the word “heritage” in the English language! While many farmers now use the term, Frank and his team raise the truest example of the original Heritage Turkey: according to the USDA, he remains the only farmer allowed to use the name “Heritage” on his label thanks to certification by the oldest agricultural organization in North America, the American Poultry Association. All Heritage Turkeys are certified to be humanely raised with no antibiotics at all, ever.

Bourbon Red Turkey at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch
Bourbon Red Turkey at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch

Heritage Turkeys come from bloodlines dating back to the mid 1800s. The unbelievable flavor of the white and dark meat has been heralded by the greatest chefs of our time. So remember to order your Heritage Turkey early!

Heritage Turkeys arrive the Tuesday before Thanksgiving via FedEx. Get yours today!

Sustainability in BBQ from Heritage Radio Network

blue-smoke-barbecue-ribs

When our friends at Heritage Radio Network attended the Big Apple BBQ Block Party the weekend of June 8th, 2013 in New York City, it started a conversation about sustainable sourcing and barbeque. In the past, barbeque was a reflection of what was around in your area. The geography was reflected in the cuisine – you bought what was nearby and cooked it. However, as time went on, the barbeque world moved more towards industrial agriculture. Restaurants across the nation served what customers wanted, not what was necessarily available to them. Go to any BBQ joint and you can get ribs or brisket, so where can everybody in the country get your supply of ribs from? Not your small farmer, but big giants like Smithfield, who also seemed to be a sponsor at the Big Apple Barbeque. Tune-in to learn more about sustainability in BBQ from Heritage Radio Network!

http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/4482-HRN-Prime-Episode-19-In-the-Field-Sustainability-in-BBQ

Mama’s Southern-Style Chicken ‘N Dumplings

Mama’s Southern-Style Chicken ‘N Dumplings

Recipe courtesy of Mississippi Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Chicken and dumplings Great American PublishersPhoto Credit:  istockphoto.com • Leslie Banks

If you want a little taste of the south, chicken and dumplings are a good way to go. This would be extra special with homemade chicken broth so be sure to save all the chicken extras and bones you don’t eat to make your chicken stock.

1½ cups flour

½ teaspoon salt

¾ teaspoon baking powder

1½ tablespoons butter

Milk

2 quarts chicken broth

2 to 3 cups cooked shredded chicken

Salt and pepper

Sift flour, salt and baking powder. Cut in butter. Add milk, 1 tablespoon at a time, to bring dough to consistency of pie dough. Roll dough out on floured board to ¼-inch thickness. Cut into strips. Cut strips into 2- to 3-inch lengths. Bring broth to rapid boil. Add chicken then salt and pepper to taste.  Drop dumplings into boiling broth and cook until dumplings float to the top. Taste one to make sure they are no longer “doughy.” You may add butter if you need more fat in the broth.

 

Mississippi Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Great American Publishers

www.GreatAmericanPublishers.com

1.888.854.5954

 

Heritage Radio Network Hawaiian BBQ Recap

Congrats to our friends at Heritage Radio Network for throwing an incredible Hawaiian BBQ party last night. We, along with several hundred other guests, enjoyed delicious food and drink accompanied by Island tunes. If you missed the annual garden party, enjoy some of our favorite photos.

Heritage_XPro-4 Heritage_XPro-279

Heritage_X100s-196 Heritage_XPro-79 Heritage_XPro-86 Heritage_XPro-117

Heritage_X100s-328 Heritage_X100s-383 Heritage_X100s-370Heritage_XPro-502 GiveLove-1 Heritage_XPro-346 Heritage_XPro-1 Heritage_X100s-200Heritage_XPro-238 Heritage_XPro-467

© 2013 Brian Eden | brianedenphotography.com

Would you eat a lab-grown burger?

Cultured-Beef-01_248

A burger made from Cultured Beef

Credit: David Parry / PA Wire

Today, at 1pm in London the world’s first “Cultured Beef” burger was unveiled in front of 200 journalists and academics. In a lab at Maastricht University, Professor Mark Post and his team harvested muscle cells from a living cow (organically raised cows from Belgium), placed into a culture dish and through the wonder of science the cells grow into meat strands. Thousands of these small strands of meat are combined to make a good ole’ fashioned hamburger.

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A cooked burger made from Cultured Beef

Credit: David Parry / PA Wire

The “burger”, if we can call it that, is touted as a sustainable alternative to current meat production. According the Cultured Beef website, “livestock contributes to global warming through unchecked releases of methane, a greenhouse gas 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide. The increase in demand will significantly increase levels of methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide and cause loss of biodiversity. Cultured Beef is likely a more sustainable option that will change the way we eat and think about food forever.”

They make a good point. Current methods of producing meat are a mess and our society should absolutely be looking for alternative solutions. But I really don’t think a lab-grown burger is our only option.

I would suggest we look to farmers outside of the factory farm system. Farmers who use sustainable and humane methods to raise real live cattle. Learn more about the partner farmers we work with on a daily basis who provide beef. Real beef.

 

You can learn more about the science behind the Cultured Beef and watch the showcase via livestream at http://culturedbeef.net

 

Fried Maple Pork Chops

Fried Maple Pork Chops

Recipe courtesy of Georgia Hometown Cookbook.

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Maple syrup and pork chops are such a beautiful combination of sweet and savory. The crowd favorite heritage pork chops get just that much better with a touch of our Deep Mountain Maple Syrup. Enjoy!

Fried Maple Pork Chops Great American Publishers

Photo Credit:  istockphoto.com • happykimmy

8 (¾-inch thick) pork chops

Maple Syrup

Black pepper

Paprika

All-purpose flour

Minced onion

Spread a very small amount of maple syrup over each pork chop. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and paprika. Dredge lightly in flour and fry in a hot nonstick skillet using a small amount of oil. While cooking, add minced onion. Serve hot. You can substitute your favorite sauce, such as soy sauce or barbecue sauce for the maple syrup, if desired.

 

Georgia Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Great American Publishers

www.GreatAmericanPublishers.com

1.888.854.5954

The Heritage Turkey – Two Ways

Sunny Turkeys

Thanksgiving is the traditional time to enjoy turkey. But everyone wants the Thanksgiving meal to be cooked in the traditional way – so you get a roasted turkey with stuffing. Delicious, but there are a million other ways to prepare turkey. Really, anything you do with chicken, you can substitute turkey. The flavors will just be more robust and flavorful.

The best way to experiment with cooking turkey is to buy the whole bird. It is not only more economical, but it also gives you the ability to play around with flavors and enjoy the meat throughout several dishes – or meals.

Here, we have two tasty and very different turkey preparations using the whole bird. One of our own HFUSA staff created both recipes, so we can attest to the cheers that erupted at the table when they were presented!  One is a sweet and sour turkey dish over cold noodles (using the thighs, legs and wings) while the other is a spicy coconut turkey dish served over rice or with lettuce wraps (using the breasts).

Be sure to keep any extra turkey trimmings, the back and all the bones to make a lovely poultry stock. Homemade stock is my favorite thing to keep in the freezer. I use homemade stock for risottos or the base for numerous sauce and soups. You can also substitute stock for water when cooking rice, couscous or other grains for a richer flavor.

Enjoy our whole Heritage Turkey today and try these two very different, very delicious preparations.

Sweet & Sour Turkey

Ingredients:

Marinade

½ cup sugar

½ cup soy sauce

¼ cup rice vinegar

3 cloves of garlic (roughly chopped)

1.5 tablespoons fish sauce

1 inch chuck of garlic (chopped into 3 pieces)

2-8 red chilies (depending on amount of heat you want!)

zest of 1 lime (peeled in strips, not grated)

 

Dressing

½ cup sugar

½ cup soy sauce

¼ cup rice vinegar

3 cloves of garlic (diced)

1.5 tablespoons fish sauce

1 inch chuck of garlic (diced)

2-8 red chilies (depending on type and amount of heat you want!)

zest and juice of 1 lime (grated and juiced)

fresh lemon juice to taste

handful of fresh mint

 

Thighs, legs, and wings of the Heritage Turkey

1 head of Napa Cabbage

Rice noodles

 

  • Preheat the oven to 350
  • Separate the thighs, legs and wings from the remainder of the Turkey (save breasts for other dish and remaining pieces for stock)
  • Season the pieces with salt and pepper
  • Sear turkey in cast iron pan, skin side down, until you get a nice browned color across the skin side
  • While the turkey is searing, prepare your marinade
  • In a bowl combine the marinade ingredients, taste and adjust as needed
  • Flip turkey pieces over so flesh side is against the pan
  • Add marinade mixture plus 1 cup water to the pan
  • Cover with tin foil and braise in the oven for 2 hours, until the meat falls off the bone
  • Check turkey every half hour, scoop marinade liquid over turkey pieces to maintain moistness
  • As the turkey cooks, the marinade should reduce to form your sauce but you may need to add water as you go so turkey is not cooking dry
  • While the turkey cooks, prepare your rice noodles according to package instructions and shred the Napa cabbage.
  • Also, make the dressing for your noodles. You should notice the dressing and marinade ingredients are very similar so the flavors will be complimentary.
  • Once done, take pan out of oven and allow turkey to rest for 10-15 minutes
  • Taste the pan sauce and adjust as needed. Use to glaze the turkey.
  • Dress cabbage and noodles with dressing mixture then garnish with the chiffonade of fresh mint

GSTR_TurkeyBreed2

Coconut Turkey

Ingredients:

Turkey breasts

2 cans coconut milk

zest of 1 lime (peeled in strips, not grated)

1 bay leaf

1 inch ginger (sliced thin)

3 onions

3 tablespoons curry powder

1-2 cloves of garlic

1 tablespoon sugar

2-3 red chilies (depending on type and amount of heat you want!)

Optional: 1/3 cup coconut milk powder

Diced scallions and cilantro for garnish

  • Preheat the oven to 350
  • Separate breasts at the bone and put them on a rack in a roasting pan
  • Season with salt and pepper
  • Pour can of coconut milk over the turkey
  • Add the peel of 1 lime, 1 bay leaf, the sliced ginger, 1 onion quartered
  • Cover in tin foil and cook in oven until tender and done, about 2 hours
  • While the turkey cooks, pull out a separate pan to sauté 2 whole diced onions
  • When clear and fragrant, remove onion from pan and keep in small bowl
  • In same pan, toast 3 table spoons of curry until fragrant
  • Add onions back to pan and diced ginger, 1-2 cloves diced garlic, chilies, 1 can of coconut milk and tablespoon sugar
  • Warm the sauce in pan to thicken
  • When turkey is done, rest for 20 minutes
  • Strain the cooking liquid from the turkey and add to sauce pan
  • If you want to thicken the sauce more, you can add another 1/3 cup coconut milk powder, but it is not essential
  • Pull turkey off the bone and slice on a bias. Add meat to the coconut mixture
  • Put in a serving dish and garnish with diced cilantro and scallions
  • Serve over rice along with lettuce wraps if desired

The Grilling Book: Jalapeño Cheeseburgers with Bacon

76Burger

Photo credit; Penden + Munk

Grilling is the world’s oldest method of cooking and here at Heritage Foods USA we take it seriously. So, when we saw that Adam Rapoport, editor of Bon Appétit magazine, had compiled a collection of 380 recipes called The Grilling Book: the Definitive Guide from Bon Appétit, our stomachs started to growl. The entire office has been drooling over this door-stopper of a book as much because of the beautiful images as the recipes themselves.

Rapoport not only shares some of the most delicious and inspiring recipes from the pages of Bon Appétit, he also offers helpful advice for both the novice and professional grill-master. This is definitely a book you’ll want to keep close to your grill this summer.

One of our staff favorites is the Jalapeño Cheeseburgers with Bacon. This would be delicious with any of our varieties of burger – Angus, Akaushi/Angus, Highland or even Bison. Topped with bacon from any of our five kinds of Heritage Bacon for the perfect summer treat.

Why aren’t you at the grill yet?

Jalapeño Cheeseburgers with Bacon

Makes 8

If you’re a chile hound, here’s one for you. Chopped jalapeño is blended straight into the burgers (if you want to amp up the heat even more, include some of the seeds) and gives spice to the spicy ranch sauce. The burgers gain another layer of flavor from a Worcestershire-coffee glaze that gets brushed on while they grill.

SPICY RANCH SAUCE

4 scallions, finely chopped

1 cup mayonnaise

1 cup sour cream

½ cup chopped fresh cilantro

6 Tbsp. fresh lime juice

2 Tbsp. minced seeded jalapeño

½ tsp. cayenne pepper

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

BURGERS

2 lb. ground beef (20% fat)

1 small onion, chopped (about 1 ¼ cups)

¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce

1 Tbsp. chopped seeded jalapeño

1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

1 tsp. kosher salt

¼ tsp. cayenne pepper

 

WORCESTERSHIRE-COFFEE GLAZE

⅓ cup light corn syrup

2 Tbsp. ketchup

2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce

2 tsp. (packed) light brown sugar

1 tsp. instant coffee powder

3 Tbsp. unsalted butter

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

16 slices bacon

Vegetable oil, for brushing

8 hamburger buns or 3- to 4-inch square focaccia rolls, split horizontally

8 lettuce leaves

2 cups coarsely shredded sharp white cheddar (about 8 oz.)

Assorted additional toppings (such as tomato and grilled onion slices)

 

SAUCE

Whisk first 7 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend. Season sauce with salt and pepper.

BURGERS

Gently mix all ingredients in a large bowl. Form mixture into eight ½- to ¾-inch thick patties. Using your thumb, make a small indentation in the center of each. Place on a small baking sheet. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours and up to 1 day.

GLAZE

Stir first 5 ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat until coffee is dissolved. Remove from heat. Whisk in butter. Season glaze to taste with salt and pepper. Working in batches if necessary, cook bacon in a large skillet over medium high heat until crisp and brown. Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Build a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill, or heat a gas grill to high. Brush grill grate with oil. Toast buns until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer buns, cut side up, to plates. Place lettuce on each bun bottom. Grill burgers for 2 to 3 minutes, basting with glaze. Turn burgers and baste with glaze. Press cheese atop each burger. Grill until cooked to desired doneness, 2 to 3 minutes longer for medium-rare. Spread some sauce on buns and assemble burgers, topping each with 2 slices bacon and additional toppings as desired.

From The Grilling Book: the Definitive Guide from Bon Appétit/Andrews McMeel, LLC

What is No Goat Left Behind?

Goat_hero

No Goat Left Behind is a serious effort launched in 2011 by Heritage Foods USA designed to introduce goat meat to American diners and provide a sustainable end market for dairy animals. Without an end market farmers must face difficult choices each spring when the kids are born. [Did you know that most goats have twins or triplets?]

You may also be surprised to learn that goat is the most widely consumed meat in the world with a rich and diverse culinary history. Most American’s have only had goat once or twice, usually in an ethnic restaurant when they where feeling bold. The flavor of our goat is delicate and grassy the cuts are similar in size and composition to lamb.

Goat is a seasonal animal and this October our goal is to sell 1000 animals. Over 14 family farms and almost 100 restaurants have committed to participate in No Goat Left Behind. Our partner farmers will raise their goats to Heritage Foods USA’s specifications, guaranteeing pasture-raised animals with no growth hormones or antibiotics. Our partner chefs will create a cornucopia of delicious dishes and recipes.

Goat dairies are in the business of making cheese. To make cheese you need milk, and to get milk each season the goats must have babies. In a weird way these babies are a bi-product of a farm that is looking to produce milk. The labor and feeding costs of caring for these babies is significant. Since the farm needs the mother’s milk to produce cheese, the babies are fed on expensive milk replacer, a goat version of baby formula. Without a dependable end market for these animals farmers simply cannot take on the financial burden and must face hard choices like selling the animals into the commodity market at a few days old or even killing them at birth.

You can change this reality by purchasing goat meat each fall from a trusted butcher like the Heritage Meat Shop in New York’s Historic Essex Market, eating in a restaurant that participates in the project or buying and cooking some goat yourself through our mail order program. However you choose to participate, we applaud your commitment to shaping a food system we can all be proud of. One that respects the realities our nation’s farmers face and honors the animals we consume.

Click here to purchase this fall http://store.heritagefoodsusa.com/goat-coming-in-october-p977.aspx

Last year participating restaurants included:

New York City: Al Di La, Babbo, Bar Boulud, Back Forty, Becco, Betto, Cleaver Company, Colicchio and Sons, Corsino, Community Food and Drink, Egg, El Almacen, Employees Only, Fatty Crab Downtown, Fatty Cue, Fatty Cue Brooklyn, Fette Sau, Gramercy Tavern, Heritage Meat Shop, Isa, Lincoln, Lupa, Maialino, Má Pechê, Minetta Tavern, Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssam Bar, Momo Sushi, Northern Spy, Otto, Ottomanelli & Sons, Palo Santo, Pulino’s, Purple Yam, Roberta’s, Salumeria Rosi, Spotted Pig, Tia Pol, Union Square Café, Untitled, Vinegar Hill House. 

Bay Area: Americano Restaurant, Bi Rite Market, Celadon, Fatted Calf Napa, Fatted Calf San Francisco, Oliveto, Plate Shop, Universal Cafe. 

Other: Hominy Grill, VA; B & B, Carne Vino, Otto, NV; Lidia’s Kansas City, MO; Quiessence, AZ

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