Author: Patty Lee


Heritage Radio Network Hawaiian BBQ

Our friends at Heritage Radio Network know a thing or two about parties and pigs. They are currently gearing up for their Hawaiian BBQ Hog Roast which will take place on August 11 in the garden at Roberta’s.

Find out more and get your tickets here http://hrnhawaiianbbq.eventbrite.com/

BBQEVENT

More from HRN

Hang out in the ultimate urban garden at Roberta’s Pizza and enjoy a family-style feast that will take you from the mean streets of NYC to the breezy beaches of the Big Island.  We’ll start the night with Hors d’oeuvers from Roberta’s Catering and then we’ll say, “Aloha” to Daniel Delaney of Delaney BBQ. Daniel will be the honorary Pitmaster, slow cooking a delicious Heritage Foods USA hog.  

 

Joining Delaney is an all-star line up of chefs. Chris Bradley of Untitled, Kyle Knall of Maysville, and the Court St. Grocers crew will be making some killer sides to compliment the unctuous pork. La New Yorkina will cap the night with their signature frozen treats.  The Anfora restaurant team will be on hand to mix up cocktails, and Empire Brewing Company will be our exclusive beer sponsor. 

 

Don’t forget to check out the Food + Art Silent Auction during the event. Enjoy a cocktail while bidding on unique food art created by artists Margarita Korol, Erin Jang, Brooke David, Mike Geno and more.

 

Let Tom Douglas Plan your Seattle Foodie Fantasy! Chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Tom Douglas boasts over a dozen restaurants within 10 blocks in downtown Seattle. His menus range from seafood to Northern Italian to a Tibetan dumpling food truck. And he wants you to spend the weekend in his town, his way! This is a man who knows food so you can trust him to treat you right in his adopted city. This fabulous weekend will be raffled away so get a head start and buy your raffle tickets early for your chance to win. $10 per raffle ticket.

NYC Mayoral Food Forum

New York City’s mayoral election season is heating up. Amidst the controversies and politics, a new topic is emerging that has tremendous effect on the citizens of New York. Food is one of the most pressing topics today – access, production, distribution, and service – these all directly effect New Yorkers and all Americans.Recently our partners at Heritage Radio Network covered the NYC Mayoral Food Forum. Below is there coverage of the event.New-Picture-72

On July 17th, 2013, Dr. Marion Nestle moderated a discussion about food and health in New York City with six of NYC’s mayoral candidates. The event has been dubbed the NYC Mayoral Food Forum 2013, and HRN’s Sari Kamin is here to recap the event. Find out where some of NYC’s mayoral candidates stand on issues like childhood nutrition, access to school lunches, and local food. Hear from food professionals such as St. John’s Bread & Life’s Christy Robb, HRN’s Katy Keiffer, and Just Food’s Nadia Johnson! Are the candidates really securing good food for the city’s future? Find out this and more in this segment, and stay tuned for continued coverage of the mayoral race.

http://www.heritageradionetwork.org/episodes/4452-NYC-Mayoral-Candidate-Food-Forum-Recap

Summer Grilling & Swilling at the Astor Center

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Last week we had the pleasure to provide the meat for a lovely food and wine event at the Astor Center in New York. The event was titled “Grilling and Swilling: Hot Weather Reds and Heritage Meats,” and looked at pairing favorite summer grilling recipes with delicious red wines. The event helped raise money for our friends at Heritage Radio Network.

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Chef Emily Peterson collaborated with wine expert Kimberly Severson to bring us these summer delights!

 

Charred Oregano and Lemon Chicken

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Paired with Lagrein Rosato, Muri Gries 2012 from Alto Adige, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy

Protein: 1 Chicken, cut up into 8 or 10 bone-in service pieces (generally 2 wings, 2 drumsticks, 2 thighs, and 2 or 4 breast pieces)

For the Marinade:

1 lemon

1/3 cup kosher salt

2/3 cup dried oregano

2 cups unoaked white wine

 

1. Melt one cup butter in a small sauce pan. Add the juice of the lemon and turn off the heat

2. In a large bowl, or gallon-sized zip top bag, combine the salt and oregano. Completely coat each piece of chicken in the mixture so that you can barley see any chicken through the coating.

3. Grill the chicken over high heat. As you turn it, basted it with the butter-lemon mixture. Cook until you have good color all the way around. This takes about 15 minutes. It smells amazing and you’ll understand why you’re outside when you see the herb-scented smoke plumes floating over your neighbor’s place.

4. Transfer the chicken to a pot large enough to comfortably hold it all, add the wine and remaining butter-lemon mixture and tightly cover. You can proceed from here either on a gar grill or inside on the stovetop.

5. Cook the chicken over medium-low for about 90 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and falling off the bone.

 

Pork Soulvaki with Tzatziki and Pita

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Paired with Touraine Rouge ‘Les Cots Hauts,’ Mikael Bouges 2010 from Touraine, Loire, France

 

Protein: 2 lbs pork shoulder, cut into two inch cubes

 

For the Marinade:

2 cups red wine

2 tsp dried oregano

2 tsp ground cumin

2 tsp dried thyme

1 tsp cinnamon

6 cloves smashed garlic

kosher salt

Freshly ground pepper

1 whole red onion, peeled, root and stem end removed

 

For the Tzatziki

2 cups grated cucumber, seeds avoided

2 cups full-fat Greek yogurt

½ cup chopped fresh mint leaves

A heavy glug of extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbs finely minced garlic

Kosher salt to taste

 

Serve with 4 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias

1 cup flat –leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Warm pita bread

 

1. combine all the marinade ingredients, including the pork, a large pinch of kosher salt and a few cracks of black pepper in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate at large 2 hours, but preferably overnight.

2. Meanwhile, make the yogurt sauce – stir together all the ingredients, starting with just a pinch of salt, then taste and add more salt if you’d like. Keep cold. This can keep in the fridge for up to a week.

3. Skewer the pork cubes onto wooden or metal skewers (if using wood, make sure the ends don’t poke out form the pork – they’ll burn even if you soak them). Grill over medium-hot, preferably charcoal, but gas will do the job too, 20-25 minutes. Generously baste with the marinade for the first 19 minutes.

4. Arrange the skewers on a pretty serving platter and sprinkle with scallions and parsley. Serve with the cold yogurt sauce and the pita, wrapped in a beautiful tea towel.

 

Korean Beef Bulgolgi Ssambap

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Paired with Lambtusco ‘Il Giullare,’ Roberto Negri 2011 from Lambrusco, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

 

Protein: 2 pounds of sirloin steak sliced very thin across the bias (or boneless short ribs)

 

For the marinade:

2 scallions, thinly sliced

¼ cup sugar

3 Tbs chopped garlic

5 Tbs soy sauce

2 Tbs sesame oil

2 Tbs dry vermouth

1/8 tsp ground black pepper

A dash of Sriracha

 

Serve with whole bib lettuce leaves, Kimchi, Gochujang (Korean chili paste)

 

1. Combine the beef and the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Cover tightly. Refrigerate at least two hours, but preferably overnight.

2. Grill beef on a two zone grill, starting on the very hot side, flipping to the less very hot side. Cook to desired doneness,

 

Serve by placing all of the components in individual serving dishes in the center of the table. Make a wrap, using a lettuce leaf, a piece of bulgogi, kimchi and chili paste. Messy and delicious!

 

 

All-American Slider

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Pair with Lauel Glen !Za Zin 2010 from Lodi, California, USA

 

Protein: 2 pounds Ground Beef seasoned with salt and pepper

 

Fixins’

Potato slider buns

Yellow American Cheese

Ketchup

Iceberg or bib lettuce

Fresh tomato slab

 

1. Form meat into equally-sized balls, then flatten into patties. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper

2. On a two zone grill, grill over hot, then flip and finish to desired doneness.

3. Serve with fixins

 

 

See what else the Astor Center is offering at http://www.astorcenternyc.com

For more from Chef Emily check out www.thegourmandandthepeasant.com and Facebook.com/chefemilyp

And hear Heritage Radio’s Audio Gift Bag here http://www.heritageradionetwork.org/episodes/4483-HRN-Community-Sessions-Episode-165-Astor-Center-Audio-Gift-Bag

 

 

A Visit to Consider Bardwell…

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Last weekend I traveled with a group of Heritage Foods and Heritage Radio folks to Consider Bardwell Farm in West Pawlet, VT. The farm makes goat and cow cheeses the have achieved great acclaim from top chefs and cheese connoisseurs. The cheese-makers credit their amazing products to their pasture raised animals and small batch productions that are ages in caves on the farm. The taste of place (what the French call terroir) is exemplified so perfectly in these cheeses and they stand out as the heights of what American cheese-making can be.

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We had the privilege of staying in the small cottage on the farm and learn a little about its history. In 1864 Consider Stebbins Bardwell founded the first cheese-making co-op in Vermont. The farm eventually moved away from its roots, but roughly a century later partners Angela Miller, Russell Glover, and Chris Gray rediscovered the farm’s potential.

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In 2011, Heritage Foods began working with Consider Bardwell and several other local dairy farms in Vermont for our No Goat Left Behind project. We work with these farms to provide a sustainable end market for their male dairy goats and to introduce diners to wonderful flavors goat can offer.

Stay tuned for more information in October…or as we call it Goatober!

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 More on Consider Bardwell Farm

http://www.considerbardwellfarm.com/

Heritage Foods Loyalty Program

One year ago we launched our Heritage Foods USA Loyalty Program to thank you (the Enlightened Meat Buyer!) for your continued support! We are proud to keep it going for another year!

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Receive a certificate for $20 off your 2nd order.


Included with every 5th order you place (5, 10, 15, etc.), receive a free dinner for two or four: 5-Rib Pork Chop Rack or Two 14-oz Ribeye or NY Strip Steaks.


Following a 25th order (25, 50, 75, etc.), receive a free dinner for eight along with gifts from our farmers.


With your 30th order, you become a member of Heritage Foods USA’s Rare Breed Club. For more information contact Catherine.

Not Sure How Many Orders You Have Placed?

E-mail us or call us!
Tel: (718) 389-0985

*The benefits of this program do not apply to past orders, but your number of orders to date will be counted towards future benefits.

How to cook a steak

By Janani Lee

Akaushi Strip

It doesn’t seem like there should be that much mystery involved in cooking a steak, but it is not as easy as you may think…or maybe it’s way easier and you are just over thinking it. I know that until recently most steaks I cooked were either way over done or stabbed to death with a meat thermometer (usually some combination of the two), but I have since read up on the subject and can confidently grill or pan sear a steak. I consider this a major life accomplishment.

 

So, here are a few simple tips gathered from around the internet and tested in my kitchen:

Start with a good steak. At Heritage we carry Ribeye and NY or Kansas City Strip steaks. Our farmers care about the health of their cattle and the conditions they are kept in and that translates to high quality meat.

Know what you like and don’t get too distracted by lots of labels and titles. Prime, Choice, and Select are all USDA distinctions related to tenderness and marbling – they say nothing about the cow. Organic, grass-fed, and grain finished related to how the cow was raised, but can also indicate how the   beef might be. Grain finished tends to have more marbling and be more tender, while grass-fed may have a more distinct flavor and leaner, more developed muscle. Know what you are looking for in a steak and choose accordingly.

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Salt. Salt is important not only for flavor, but also for moisture. Salt draws moisture out of your beef before you cook it, so it browns better (and tastes better)

Use a thermometer. A thermometer is like an x-ray for your steak – it can tell you exactly what’s going on inside.

Rare: 125°F – 130°F
Medium-Rare: 130°F – 135°F
Medium: 140°F – 145°F
Well-Done: 160° and higher

 

Meat continues to cook after you take it off the grill, so remove your steak from the grill or pan when your thermometer is about 5 degrees less than you want it to be.


Rest. Let your steak rest before you eat it that was the juices redistribute. About 5 minutes should do it.

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Check out these other guides from The Food Lab and the Kitchn for more tips:

http://www.thekitchn.com/6-steps-for-grilling-the-best-steak-of-your-life-172700

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/05/how-to-grill-a-steak-guide-food-lab.html

Slow Cooked Salmon with Meyer Lemon Relish

By Sylvano

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Of the various ways salmon can be cooked, this one is simple and strikingly good. The salmon is baked in a very slow, humidified oven, which yields a moist, tender, velvet-textured fish. When it is served at room temperature with fennel and fava beans, or tomatoes and green beans, or beets and garden lettuces, we find it has versatility and appeal the entire season. And since it holds well for a few hours, it’s also perfect for a picnic or buffet.

Serves 6 to 8.

Ingredients

1 salmon fillet, about 3 pounds
Extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper

1 large shallot, diced fine
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar or lemon juice
Salt
1 large Meyer lemon
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped chervil or chives
Pepper

Directions

PREHEAT the oven to 200°E Place a pan of warm water on the lowest rack in the oven. This creates a humid environment that helps keep the salmon moist.

Lightly brush a baking pan with olive oil. Brush the salmon with olive oil and season generously with salt and freshly ground pepper. Place the salmon in the baking dish and put it in the oven. Allow about i hour for the salmon to cook through. If it seems to be cooking too fast, turn the oven down a bit. The salmon is cooked when it is just barely firm to the touch and juices are beginning to collect on top of the fillet. Let it rest at least 10 minutes, or up to 3 hours, at room temperature.

Meanwhile, get to work on the Meyer Lemon Relish. Put the diced shallot in a small bowl. Add the vinegar and a pinch of salt. Macerate for 10 to 15 minutes. Cut the lemon into 8 wedges. Remove the seeds and central core from each piece, then cut each wedge in half lengthwise. Slice the wedges crosswise into thin slivers. You will have about ½ cup. Combine the slivered lemon and shallot and add a little more salt. Stir in the olive oil, parsley, chervil, and some freshly milled pepper. Taste and adjust the seasoning.

To serve, break Salmon into rough pieces, surround with summer vegetable salads, and accompany with Meyer Lemon Relish.

Maple-soy glazed Pork Tenderloin on Sautéed Kale by Chef Scott Benjamin of Four Olives Wine Bar

 

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Ingredients

 

1 Duroc Pork Tenderloins

 

3-4 pounds of Kale

 

1 cup good soy sauce
1 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine from Japan)
1 cup real maple syrup
pinch of red pepper flakes
2 onions quartered
2 carrots peeled and chopped roughly
2T brown sugar
10 green onions with roots cut off
2 chunks of ginger peeled and chopped

 

10 green onions green part only
2T pine nuts
2T olive oil
Sea salt
Black pepper

Directions

Cut ribs out of 3-4 pounds of kale.
Blanch kale in salted water just until tender (about 4 min).
Shock kale in ice water, remove when chilled and squeeze out as much water as possible.

Combine in saucepan:
1 cup good soy sauce
1 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine from Japan)
1 cup real maple syrup
pinch of red pepper flakes
2 onions quartered
2 carrots peeled and chopped roughly
2T brown sugar
10 green onions with roots cut off
2 chunks of ginger peeled and chopped

Bring to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes, strain off solids and reserve sauce.

Combine:
10 green onions green part only
2T pine nuts
2T olive oil
Pinch of salt
Pinch of black pepper

Process in blender, you may need to add a little more olive oil.

Trim any excess fat off of pork, place in cold fry pan and slowly bring up heat.  When fat has rendered off of pork, strain and reserve.

Season pork tenderloins with sea salt and fresh ground black pepper.

Bring a few tablespoons of canola oil to a light smoke in a large nonstick fry pan.

Sear pork until well browned on each side, then kill heat and ladle sauce on top of pork.  Return to medium heat and cook two minutes in the pan.

Transfer pork to a glass baking pan, and place in 400°F oven for a few minutes until internal temperature reaches 145°F (medium) be careful, these large cuts will rise in temp after they are pulled from the oven.

Meanwhile, put a few tablespoons of pork fat in nonstick fry pan and bring to a light smoke. Add Kale, pinch of salt and black pepper, sauté until a little brown is in the edges of the leaves, but still has a bright green color.

Center kale on plate, chop on top, use a spoon to drizzle a little of the sauce around the plate.
Garnish with a little green onion pesto on top

 

image http://www.flickr.com/photos/64443083@N00/8426576724/

Grilled Vietnamese-Style Pork with Asian Herbs

by Chef Erica Wides of the Institute of Culinary Education

Grilled-pork-chops-with-Basil-garlic-rub

Ingredients

Pork Marinade
Blend in a blender or food processor:
4 cloves garlic, peeled
3 shallots, peeled
2 Tablespoons Chinese rice wine or sake
1 1/2 Tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup fish sauce
1 Tablespoon canola, or peanut oil
1 1/2 pounds boneless pork tenderloin, trimmed and sliced lengthwise in half
Fresh Asian herbs: cilantro, mint, Thai basil
1/2 cup chopped peanuts
sliced cucumbers

For Nuoc Cham, Vietnamese Dressing
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
juice of 3 limes
1/4 cup Thai fish sauce
3 Tablespoons sugar
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
2 Tablespoons shredded carrots

Directions

1. In a shallow dish, combine the pork and the marinade and cover with plastic wrap. Allow pork to marinate at room temperature for 2 hours.
2. Prepare a grill pan, charcoal fire, or broiler.
3. Grill or broil the pork for 10-15 minutes or until an instant read thermometer reads 140.
Transfer the pork to a cutting board, and let it rest 5 minutes. Slice on the diagonal in very thin slices and arrange on a platter. Sprinkle the herbs and peanuts on top and serve with sliced cucumbers and the dressing.

For Nuoc Cham, Vietnamese Dressing:
Mix well to dissolve the sugar, store in the refrigerator. Keeps for 4-5 days

 

Image via http://theaahfactor.com

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