Category: Heritage Beef


Salumi Bolognese Casarecce

This recipe is adapted from Food and Wine’s Pasta with Salumi Bolognese – a smart, efficient, and tasty way to make the most of your salumi ends!

Ingredients
1 box Baia pasta, Casarecce
2 14.5oz. can of whole tomatoes
2 tbsp. tomato paste
2 oz. prosciutto or country ham ends
2 oz. mixed salumi ends
8 oz. ground beef
1 cup red cooking wine
1 cup water
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 garlic clove, grated on a microplane
2 basil springs
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper

Procedure
1. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the salumi, prosciutto, and ground beef to the pot and brown on all sides. Strain excess fat and add the grated garlic and tomato paste, allowing them to toast until the tomato paste becomes a dark brick red. Deglaze the pan with 1 cup of red cooking wine. Then add the canned tomatoes, breaking them up as they cook. Once all of the tomatoes are crushed to the desired amount, add 1 cup of water and continue to cook. Add the bay leaf, basil sprigs, salt and pepper and allow the sauce to simmer.
2. As the sauce is simmering, fill a 6 quart pot halfway up with hot water and bring it to a boil. When the water is at a rolling boil, add two handfuls of kosher salt and allow it to dissolve. Add 1 box of dry pasta to the boiling water and cook for about twelve minutes (or longer, depending on the desired doneness), stirring occasionally to avoid sticking.
3. Strain the pasta when it is cooked to the desired doneness, reserving two cups of the starchy pasta water. Add the strained pasta to the salumi bolognese over low heat and stir, adding pasta water as needed to loosen up the final product.

The Best Burger You’ve Ever Had

Great burgers start with great ingredients. We recommend our Akaushi/Angus 8oz burger patties—a perfect combination of robust beefy flavor from the Angus and tender marbling from the Japanese Akaushi. Looking for more ways to up your burger game?  Check out our burger tips below for guaranteed juicy patties every time.

Our Friend, Angelo Garro

Angelo Garro of Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma; spice provider to Alice Waters, Francis Ford Coppola and Werner Herzog; friend to Heritage since the beginning.

Angelo is a master blacksmith by trade and a passionate hunter, forager, cook and Slow Food icon. Growing up in Sicily he learned the wonder of herbs like the wild fennel that grew around his childhood home and the importance of good ingredients — all of Angelo’s home-made salumi and prosciutti are made using 100% Heritage Foods meat.

We visited Angelo a few weeks ago, as we do every winter, in his Forge in San Francisco. He explains that when cooking heritage meat, the simplest of preparation is best. Angelo seasons heritage meats liberally with salt, pepper and spices — he has created a special spice blend that he has been using for years with every meat he cooks called Omnivore Salt — and allows the meat and seasoning to mingle for 30-40 minutes before he sears it quickly over high heat, creating a beautifully crisp outer crust.

Angelo uses wood fire whenever possible, but a cast iron skillet will offer a similar result. For our heritage pork loin, Angelo tosses fresh greens with a simple dressing to create a delicious bed on which the pork is served family-style.

 

The Perfect Roast for You and Yours

This Holiday Season, Go Big with a Classic Heritage Centerpiece!porchetta

The biggest occasions deserve the best meats in America. Like all of our meats, our centerpieces are raised humanely, on pasture without antibiotics or hormones, and produce the best natural flavor and texture you have ever experienced. These are not your grandma’s pot roast — our beef ribeye, rack of lamb, tenderloin, porchetta, and cured hams are the best of their kind, easy to cook, and sensational to serve for family dinner or the most elegant holidays. And did we mention the leftovers?

Know Your Roasts!

Some meats just seem more festive than others, but you can always count on pleasing the crowd with a Heritage roast or centerpiece. We find beef tenderloin, aka filet mignon, to be perfect for elegant dinner parties. Pork tenderloin, too, is an exquisite focal point for any occasion. Our custom made, hand-rolled porchetta, is a rare treat — crispy and rich and an impressive showstopper for even the meat connoisseur. Leg of lamb, and the celebrated rack of lamb, are perhaps the most festive centerpieces of them all, fit for a royal banquet! Of course cured hams and whole chickens never fail to please, whether it’s a holiday, Sunday dinner, or just a weeknight treat. The best part is that they are all easy to prepare — and spectacular to present!

Prepare Simply for Spectacular Results

A ten pound leg of lamb may seem like a challenge next to a 14 oz. pork chop, but we are here to tell you, don’t worry! Here is the best advice from the Heritage Team and our network of chefs:

There is no wrong way to cook great meat, but we recommend keeping it simple. Just use salt and pepper and your favorite herbs as primary seasoning. We love beef with just salt and pepper, but lamb also loves rosemary and thyme. Pork, too, loves a creative touch, but remember: this is the very best heritage meat in the world, and the flavor is already there, a product of the best breeds, farmed traditionally. There is nothing to hide, the taste says it all.

Click here to shop our selection

wagyu ribeye

What is Wagyu Beef?

The name Wagyu refers to any Japanese breed of beef. Kobe is a type of Wagyu, as is Mishima. For the past decade Heritage Foods has sourced Akaushi, a spectacular breed of Wagyu, arguably the most intensely marbled beef breed in the world. Akaushi is the Japanese Red Cow, a national treasure in Japan.

wagyu ribeye
wagyu ribeye steaks, Akaushi/Angus

The first Akaushi cattle arrived to the United States in 1992. Three bulls and eight cows left Japan on a custom equipped Boeing 747, headed for the Texas heartland, where they have been treated as celebrities since day one. Our Akaushi steaks are sourced from the very same family of farms that first brought the breed to the United States.

Purebred Akaushi is the authentic taste of Japanese beef, lighter than you might expect, with a silky quality and a surprising elegance.

Akaushi/Angus steak is a Wagyu that results from cross breeding the revered Akaushi with America’s mighty Angus, creating a profound steak experience. Boasting a bold, classic steak flavor, punctuated with the nuance of perfect marbling, this is our top selling steak.

Beyond the legacy of two great beef cultures — Japan and Texas —it’s also nice to know that Akaushi beef has among the lowest cholesterol of any meat sold in the USA, making these Heritage steaks a healthy indulgence as well as a sure-fire crowd pleasers.

Ribeye Steaks, boneless, Akaushi/Angus four 14-16oz steaks $119
NY Strip Steak, boneless, Akaushi/Angus four 14-16oz steaks $119
Ribeye Steaks, boneless, Pure Akaushi four 12oz steaks $157
NY Strip Steak, boneless, Pure Akaushi four 12oz steaks $157
NY Strip Steak, bone-in, Akaushi/Angus two 18-20oz steaks $99
Porterhouse Steak, Akaushi/Angus one 32oz steak $89
Porterhouse Steak, Akaushi/Angus two 32oz steaks $170 Continue reading “What is Wagyu Beef?”

Cattle Share from the Kitchen of B&B Ristorante, Las Vegas

Participating in our 1/8 cattle share program challenges you to eat like a true chef. Cattle shares are the most direct way to support sustainable farmers and are a great way to access exceptional beef produced outside of commercial scale.

Our partnering chefs and loyal customers have come to love our yearly cattle shares. This marks Chef Jason Neve’s second year bringing in a 1/2 cattle to B&B Ristorante, Las Vegas. He wrote a wonderful thank you note to farmers Craig and Amy Good, which we are delighted to share with you along with photos from the restaurant.

“I think we are the ones that are privileged to be working with such a great product.  I have been in the kitchen since 8:30 this morning like a kid in a candy store cooking up this part and that part.  I LOVE IT.

 Just finished the Neck Ragu that we will serve as a pasta tonight.  It took 24 hours to cook, and you can taste every minute of care from the time that you put into raising a great animal, the Fantasmas’ care in slaughtering and our time cooking it.”

For more information about purchasing a cattle share of your own click HERE.

Jason Neve

Chef Jason Neve

Born and raised in Cape Canaveral, Florida, Jason grew up around the water and all of its fresh seafood. An early interest in cooking for family and friends evolved into an education at the Culinary Institute of America where he graduated in 2003. Jason moved to New York City to train at AIX Restaurant under Chef Didier Virot. In 2005, Jason was part of the opening team at Del Posto. Jason’s aptitude in the kitchen and his passion for cured meats lead him out west to Las Vegas in 2007. After five years at the helm of the kitchen at B&B Ristorante, Jason was appointed Culinary Director of B&B Hospitality Group’s Las Vegas operations.

Belted Galloway 1/8 Cattle Shares Are Here!

 

burger-belted

As we began to ready ourselves for the arrival of our Belted Galloway 1/8 Cattle Shares we realized that the Belties were missing from our tasting notes! We immediately rounded up the crew and invited our friends for an impromptu afternoon of tasting. Here’s what we came up with– a complete list that has been discussed, deliberated, and finally decided to be the most accurate words to describe the flavor of Belted Galloway beef. Enjoy!

Belted Galloway Tasting Notes

Clean

Clover

Olive

Hints of Fruit

Simple Richness

Zesty Bright

Bouncy

Textured

Nice Finish

Exquisite

One of Our Favorites

 

About the Belted Galloway

There are fewer than 2,500 registered Belties in the US. Belted Galloway’s are a heritage breed of cattle originating from Scotland. They are adept grazers and known for their smaller frame and excellent marbling. The meat is herbaceous and grassy in flavor. These animals are well suited to the harsh winters of Central New York and lush pastures in the spring, summer and fall. They are raised on pasture and finished on grain to ensure impeccable marbling.

Belted_galloways_bei_neukoog_nordstrand

Heritage Beef Taste Chart

Cattle Breed Histories and Heritage Beef Taste ChartTasteChartBeef

Cooking is easy. Mother Nature + the skill of a responsible farmer = the only recipe you should ever fuss over. Rather than filling your shelves with epic recipe books, how about breed charts that describe the gastronomic wonders of every livestock variety? “One 32-ounce flank steak” as the prime mover in a recipe is not enough information for the enlightened carnivore. Where does that beef come from— farm and breed, please! And was it from a happy cow that led a decent cow life grazing and doing happy cow things?

Heritage Foods USA only brings in a few whole animals a year. Most of the time we only purchase cuts from various farms around the country, primarily ribeye, strip, tenderloin, hangar and brisket. As a result we have a lot of freedom to pick different breeds to bring in for our direct to consumer business that showcase how delicious cattle can be. Among our favorite breeds are the Piedmontese, Belgian Blue, Highland, Simmental, Akaushi, and Angus. We also bring in Bison! But stay tuned to our website for even more options.

Piedmontese and Belgian Blues are the only two breeds of cow that have the “double-muscle” gene, which makes them extraordinarily tender. And these cows are loaded with myostatin, a protein that inhibits muscle differentiation and growth. As a result, you get a supremely tender and delicious cut of beef.

Belgian Blue

As the name implies, Belgian Blue Cattle originated in central and upper Belgium, and at one time they accounted for nearly half of the cattle in the national herd. Like most cattle breeds the Belgian Blue was originally a dual-purpose animal producing both milk and meat. In the 1960’s many breeders worked to develop cattle of a more ‘meaty type’ . As a result, they developed the Belgian Blue we have today.

The Belgian Blue is an impressive looking animal most famous for its prominent muscling, commonly referred to as “double muscling”. The extreme muscling is especially prevalent in the shoulder, back, loin and rump area. This unique characteristic is due to skillful breeding in the 1960’s. The Belgian Blue Breed of beef cattle is relatively new to the United States but is rapidly developing a following. These cattle can be white, blue roan or sometimes black and they are known for their quiet temperament.

Belgian Blue Cattle were selected for their natural leanness and fine muscle fiber, which makes the meat healthful and tender. Special care must be taken when cooking Belgian Blue Beef because it cooks faster than traditional beef due to the low fat content.

Simmental

Simmental cattle are native to Switzerland, their name paying tribute to valley of the Simme River. Though this resilient breed can be traced back to the Middle Ages, the first Simmental met American soil when it arrived in Illinois in 1887. Thanks to this animal’s ability to adapt to diverse environments, there are currently between 40 and 60 million Simmentals in existence worldwide. A naturally lean beef, Simmentals are known for their rapid growth, heavy muscling, and healthy size. These characteristics produce a hearty, tender cut of beef with minimal fat. Simmentals are meant to eat grass year round. The grass-fed diet yields a gamier, more pronounced flavor and is considerably less sweet than commercial beef. For this reason, our Simmental beef tastes undoubtedly different from its grain- finished cousins: it’s bold, earthy, and best when cooked to medium-rare.

Highland

Highland Cattle are the oldest registered breed of cattle, officially recognized in 1884. The Queen of England maintains her own Highlands at Balmoral Castle. The Highland breed has lived for centuries in the rugged remote Scottish Highlands. Cold weather and snow have little effect on them so they can be raised as far north as Alaska and the Scandinavian countries. The extremely harsh conditions created a process of natural selection, where only the fittest and most adaptable animals survived to carry on the breed. Originally there were two distinct breeds of varying sizes. Today both of these strains are regarded as one breed – Highland. In addition to red and black, yellow, dun, white, brindle and silver are also considered traditional Highland colors.

Highlands have lived alongside humans for generations. Early Scotsmen kept their Highland cows inside the family home during the winter months, separated by only a fabric fence. Despite their long horns, long hair and unusual appearance, the Highland is considered to be a docile and calm animal. They are extremely intelligent which makes them quite easy to train.

The beef is lean and low in fat. Highlands mature slowly and are typically bred later than other breeds, so the meat is tender, well marbled and flavorful.

 Akaushi

“Akaushi” is the Japanese term for Red Cattle. The pure-bred Akaushi are a national treasure and are the only free grazing cattle in the small country of Japan, roaming the sacred mountain of Aso where they are protected by the Japanese government. Through a loophole in the Trade Act of 1992, three bulls and eight cows left Japan in a custom equipped Boeing 747 escorted by armed guards and arrived in Texas. These animals continue to be raised there and are sold as purebreds as well as mixed with Angus. Our Akaushi are cut by Paradise Locker Meats in roasts as well as into individual steaks. This breed is buttery and delicious and is Japan’s greatest gastronomic achievement when it comes to growing cattle.

At the office we came up with these flavor profiles for this breed:
“Juicy and rich”
“Delicate, sophisticated and elegant while also bold and beefy”
“This steak is absolutely delicious”
“Very unctuous with an aroma of sautéing mushrooms–lots of great umami”
“Fat specs infuse every bite with the dream of any steak house”
“When you look at the steaks you can see hundreds of white fat specs like foam on a wind swept ocean”

Piedmontese

Piedmontese cattle originated in the foothills of northwestern Italy also home to the Slow Food movement and are thought to be a mix of the Auroch and Zebu cattle crossed over 25,000 years ago. Today, in the United States, a network of family farmers is raising the cattle on a pure vegetarian feed without the use of antibiotics and without added growth hormones. Piedmontese is unique in that it contains myostatin, known as the “double muscle gene.”

Belted Galloway

There are fewer than 2,500 registered Belties in the US. Belted Galloways are a heritage breed of cattle originating from Scotland. They are adept grazers and known for their smaller frame and excellent marbling. The meat is herbaceous and grassy in flavor. These animals are well suited to the harsh winters of Central New York and lush pastures in the spring, summer and fall. They are raised on pasture and finished on grain to ensure impeccable marbling.

Let’s Grind! The importance of eating ground meat.

The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live.

— Confucius

cow

Of an average eight-hundred-pound steer on the rail, I’ve seen between 20 and 80 percent turned into ground. It’s very simple: The more meat that is ground, the fewer pieces the farmer needs to worry about selling. There are a hundred ways to cut up a cow, but how great is it when the farmer only has to worry about a few?

This all goes for lamb as well — if domestic lamb is ever going to become a growth market (instead of our importing it from New Zealand), we need to eat more ground lamb. And it also goes for goats, a great protein source and a potential profit center for independent family farmers because goats are low-maintenance livestock.

You can even grind your own meat and bring the movement right into your home. Why not? Become an expert mixologist! A good grinder will bring new life to any meat. In the meantime, try our delicious ground beef or combo breed packs!

Our Top 3 favorite ways of using Heritage Foods USA ground meat.

To defrost, submerge in pot of cold water (about 20 minutes).

1.    Season ground meat with Omnivore’s Salt and mix together. Form into patties and add to hot pan (no oil) on very high heat. Brown the first side for just a few minutes then flip burger to brown the other side. Cook until just burgundy red on the inside (just a couple of minutes if flat patty). Add to hamburger buns that have been toasted with American cheese singles on each side.

2.    Start boiling water for pasta. Sautee a nice pile of garlic shavings in a small amount of olive oil until golden brown. Add tomato sauce and 3 chopped anchovies over low heat. Meanwhile, brown your ground meat over high heat in hot pan (no oil) just for a few minutes until evenly browned. Add to sauce and cook for 10 minutes. Serve over pasta (we recommend Baia Pasta!). Add salt and pepper to taste.

3.    Combine one and two and make two main courses for dinner.

For the sustainable food movement to make an impact on America’s most unhealthy eating habits, we are going to have to play the game of convenience and infiltrate the territory traditionally staked out by McDonald’s, Burger King, Taco Bell, and their ilk. The above meals take a few minutes to make and boast the lowest portion cost in the food world.

The Angus Breed

Pure Black Angus is the premiere cattle breed for beef in the United States. The breed has ancient origins in Aberdeen and Angus, Scotland. The first Angus bulls arrived in Kansas from Scotland in 1873, garnering negative attention due to their naturally hornless heads. Because only bulls were originally brought over, many cattlemen bred them into existing herds, diluting the genetics. Later, more cows were brought from Scotland to from purebred herds, but it remains difficult to find 100% purebred herds in the US. “Certified Angus Beef” only requires 51% Angus genetics and that the meat and fat ratios are favorable.
Angus is now the most commonly used genetics in America. Black Angus is most common, but a recessive gene makes some cattle Red. Most European and Canadian breeders do not distinguish between Red and Black Angus, but register than as separate breeds in the US. Breeders favor Angus genetics because they are easy to calf and they are naturally hornless.

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