Category: Community Table


Standard Bronze Turkey

Heritage / Heirloom

Agriculture began with humans saving and planting seeds and keeping animals. Communities selected traits over generations based on the needs of the culture andRed Wattle landscape. These animals and plants were passed down through generations, continuously improving as mutual dependence between the culture and food deepened.

In this way food is cultural legacy – future generation’s inheritance, kept and passed on.

Merriam-Webster defines Heirloom and Heritage:

Heirloom:
1: a piece of property that descends to the heir as an inseparable part of an inheritance of real property
2: something of special value handed on from one generation to another
3: a horticultural variety that has survived for several generations usually due to the efforts of private individuals

Heritage:
1: property that descends to an heir
2a: something transmitted by or acquired from a predecessor : legacy, inheritance;
2b: tradition
3: something possessed as a result of one’s natural situation or birth : birthright <the nation’s heritage of tolerance>

 

Standard Bronze Turkey

How The Livestock Conservancy defines heritage breed:

Heritage breeds are traditional livestock breeds that were raised by our forefathers. These are the breeds of a bygone era, before industrial agriculture became a mainstream practice. These breeds were carefully selected and bred over time to develop traits that made them well-adapted to the local environment and they thrived under farming practices and cultural conditions that are very different from those found in modern agriculture.

Traditional, historic breeds retain essential attributes for survival and self-sufficiency – fertility, foraging ability, longevity, maternal instincts, ability to mate naturally, and resistance to diseases and parasites.

Heritage animals once roamed the pastures of America’s pastoral landscape, but today these breeds are in danger of extinction. Modern agriculture has changed, causing many of these breeds to fall out of favor. Heritage breeds store a wealth of genetic resources that are important for our future and the future of our agricultural food system.

Seed saving and genetic selection has changed drastically over the past several decades. So fast that law, morality, and popular discourse are struggling toSimmental keep up with the pace of these changes. One aspect of these debates that Heritage Foods USA feels strongly about is sustaining lines of genetic diversity within the food system.

We believe these heritage breeds of livestock are a key to a more sustainable food system and as we say, we must “Eat them to save them”.

Good Shepherd Institute

Good Shepherd Institute Agriturismo

Good Shepherd Institute

At the heart of Good Shepherd Poultry Ranch is Frank Reese, a fourth-generation farmer on a 100-year-old farm in central Kansas with more than 60 years of experience in breeding and farming heritage poultry.

This year we are proud to announce the development of The Good Shepherd Institute, a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to supporting the health of our national food system by educating agricultural experts, farmers, and students about techniques for preserving rare and heritage livestock. Course content will include both hands-on and lecture-style training. The curriculum is being developed in conjunction with Kansas Wesleyan University as an extension of their Environmental Studies Bachelor’s degree program.

We invite you to review the University program first-hand! Join Frank, working side-by-side, in a completely immersive farming experience. Learn about all aspects of sustainable heritage farming on-site at Good Shepherd Poultry Ranch while exploring the historical, biological, and cultural importance of heritage poultry. This experience is a complete program for the novice to the experienced farmer – visit a USDA certified processor, tour local historic sites and learn from experts in the field.

Good Shepherd Institute

 

Package Includes:

· 4 nights at the Swedish Country Inn.
· Breakfasts, lunches and dinners catered by local chefs.
· Transportation within Kansas.

$1400 per person
$1900 per couple

Agriturismo Tours support the development of the Good Shepherd Institute’s University accredited program, providing funding for on-site classroom facilities and program infrastructure. If you can’t make the trip and would still like to contribute, we are accepting charitable donations for continued curriculum development and infrastructure at The Good Shepherd Institute.

Please make checks payable to Good Shepherd Institute and mail to Heritage Foods USA, 790 Washington Ave, PMB 303 Brooklyn, NY 11238. Donations are tax deductible.

Wholesome Wave

As we’ve mentioned before, Heritage Foods USA is a proud promoter of biodiversity and food security. We are pleased to share the work of Wholesome Wave, which has had a tremendous impact on our nation’s access to fresh and quality foods by pioneering the National Nutrition Incentive Network. Visit Wholesome Wave’s website to see initiatives in your area.

 

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Here is some more information about Wholesome Wave:

Wholesome Wave

Vision: Affordable, healthy, local food for all.

Mission: Wholesome Wave inspires underserved consumers to make healthier food choices by increasing affordable access to fresh, local and regional food.

What We Believe: At Wholesome Wave, we believe that everyone should be able to put the same, healthy, fresh fruits and vegetables on their table and provide that for their families. Our team believes that we can use food as a very powerful, binding, changing force. Food, as a single subject, has an incredible impact on environmental, social, economic and human health. We see an undeniable truth, that if we fix food, we are going to see improved health, stronger local and regional economies, and more income for small and mid-sized farm businesses.

Wholesome Wave Georgia believes that all Georgians should have access to good, wholesome and locally-grown food. Their goal is to increase access to good food for all Georgians while contributing to the local food economy. Wholesome Wave Georgia strengthens local food communities by empowering networks of farmers to facilitate access to and awareness of healthy food choices.

By doubling each federal or state nutrition benefit (SNAP, WIC, SFMNP) dollar spent at participating partner markets, WWG leverages existing government food nutrition programs to create financial incentives for low-income shoppers to shop at local farmers markets.

The program is committed to supporting producer-only farmers markets, in which vendors are only permitted to sell items that they have grown or produced themselves.

Every nutrition benefit dollar spent at a WWG partner market becomes two dollars for the shopper and for the farmer. This means more money for local farmers and more Georgians with access to good, wholesome and locally-grown food.

 Laura 1

 

If you happen to be in Georgia this September 13th, the 6th Annual Southern Chef’s Potluck will be held from 3-6pm in benefit of Wholesome Wave Georgia – with an impressive list of participating chefs. Tickets are $150 each.

Guests will dine family style with some of the South’s chefs on the pastoral grounds of the Inn at Serenbe. In addition to food and fellowship, the event will feature local beer, wine and cocktails created by renowned mixologists and a live auction for one-of-a-kind chef experiences.

Each chef contributes a side dish along with homemade pickles, relishes and desserts to be shared. Side dishes will complement main dishes provided by White Oak Pastures and Jim N’ Nicks Bar-B-Q.

 

Wagyu Tenderloin, Heritage Foods USA

Grilled Akaushi/Angus Tenderloin

There is nothing like Akaushi/Angus Tenderloin to satisfy a hungry party. Our friend Ted shares his favorite additions to summer gatherings:

 

Ted: My approach is fairly simple, as I love the taste of the meat more than any flavoring or spice…

Wagyu Tenderloin, Heritage Foods USA

About 6-7 days prior to cooking I take the roast from the freezer and leave it in the refrigerator to defrost. After a couple of days I unwrap the cut and let it air on a rack set over a cookie sheet for 3-4 days. This will allow the surface to become firm. I flip over the small-ended fold back about 3” and secure that with a metal skewer.

The day I cook it I bring it up to a little less than room temp, salt the entire piece with Himalayan salt (a fine textured salt), and let it stand for an hour or so. I am using a Lynx grill with two regular gas burners and one high heat burner. I light the two regular burners about 20 minutes before putting the steak on. I set the temp to medium low and cook the steak about 45 -50 minutes, turning regularly.

Wagyu Tenderloin, Heritage Foods USA

I try to get the small end to about 130°, middle to 115° and thick end to 100°. We fed eleven people with 3/4 of the tenderloin and I cut the thick end into filets about 1” thick put back on the grill the next day for perfect leftovers.

 

…And for the drinks

About 2 weeks before the party buy 4-6 semi-firm but ripe peaches, 4-5 firm Fuji apples and 4-5 navel oranges.

Heritage Foods USA

Slice the peaches first, then the apples. Add the oranges on top so the citric acid keeps the apples from turning brown. I layer these in a big bowl, plastic or ceramic, then cover with equal parts Triple Sec, Peach Schnapps, Vodka, and White Rum. Cover with plastic wrap and put in the wine cellar for two weeks.

In college 50 years ago we made this in garbage cans, but a 5 gallon water bucket also works great. The day before the party I dump the fruit into the water bucket, I add 3 gallons of Italian style wine (inexpensive is fine) add approximately 750ml Peach Schnapps, 750ml Vodka, 750ml Amber Rum.

I don’t add sugar or orange juice so the only other ingredient is ice, which I like to put in the cups so it doesn’t dilute the Sangria. It’s very potent but the fruit is really the kicker –you can blend two days before, no problem.

If you can keep this cool, it will last quite a while.

 

 

 

Ted, NJ

2015 Heritage Turkey Flock

Every morning it’s the same routine for poultry farmer Frank Reese. Frank walks several thousand turkeys from their barn out to pasture, where they spend the day foraging in the rolling Kansas plains. In the evening he opens the large barn doors, cuing the flock to head indoors where they can roost safely for the night.

Exercise and access to natural forage help to keep heritage turkeys strong and healthy. It also enables the birds to develop fat, nutritional content, and flavor. Not too long ago this was how all turkeys were raised, but Frank has gone to great lengths to preserve traditional standards of raising turkeys. Each year, as his flock is developing, he closely watches the birds mature. At the end of the season Frank will select the individuals with the most desirable traits to parent the next generation.

This yearly cycle drives the sustainability of Frank’s operation. All of his turkeys mate naturally, have a long and productive lifespan, and develop at a healthy rate – simple traits that really allow his flock to stand out from commodity production.

Follow our blog for more 2015 heritage turkey updates!

 

 

 

Ribs

Summer Rib Recipe

We think of ribs as the quintessential summer party fare – they stand up to a ton of flavor and are easily prepared ahead of time. Low and slow is the name of the game. In a pinch ribs can be cooked within an hour, but if you have the time to cook them for several you will be truly rewarded. Here’s our go-to technique for ribs that will set the bar to a whole new level.

Tunis Lamb

Heritage Breed Tasting at Lupa Osteria Romana

A heritage breed tasting event was hosted at Lupa Osteria to celebrate our long standing partnership and their commitment to sustainability and biodiversity.

The Renaissance Forge

The Great Artisanal Ham Tasting 2015

In 2014 the team at S. Wallace Edwards & Sons invited us to co-host a tasting of exquisite long aged prosciutto style hams. The kind of hams Parma, Italy has made famous, but these hams were not from Europe. They came from all over the US, from producers who have been practicing traditional curing techniques for many generations.

The goal of the tasting was not to pick a winner– we were not ranking hams. Instead we were developing a vocabulary or lexicon to better describe the subtle nuances of American dry cured, long aged hams. A tradition with a long, rich history, but one that has been eschewed in favor of European hams.

The 1st Great Artisanal Ham Tasting took place under a veil of discretion in our private Brooklyn warehouse. The evening was MCed by outspoken ham evangelist Dave Arnold and food science expert Harold McGee. Chefs from the finest restaurants in New York, top curemasters, and passionate ham enthusiast joined us to taste almost 30 hams side by side.

The event was a huge success and we immediately began planning a tasting for the West Coast.

The Great Artisanal Ham Tasting 2015 was divided into two events. The first was held in San Francisco at artist Angelo Garro’s legendary art studio, The Renaissance Forge. The second was hosted by Chef Stephen Barber of Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, an idyllic vineyard and farm in the heart of the Napa Valley. Once again we invited top chefs, this time from the Bay Area and Napa Valley, along with expert curemasters, butchers and local gastronomes to assist us in defining and identifying the subtle flavors which result from differences in cure method, breed, diet, terroir, and aging conditions.

The long history of American Country Ham is one rich in tradition. We look forward to continuing to celebrate the expert craft of the American curemaster.

Check out the gallery bellow to see the results from all 3 tastings side by side along with photographs from the events.

Interested in hosting your own tasting? Let us know in the comments and we’ll help you arrange your own personal tasting!

 
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