Category: Lifestyle


Chuleta de Puerco con Piperrada Picante (Pork Chops with Spicy Pepper Sauce)

Chef Jonah Miller of Huertas in NYC shares a delicious recipe excerpt from his new book The New Spanish: Bites, Feasts, and Drinks with us!

Chuleta de Puerco con Piperrada Picante

(Pork Chops with Spicy Pepper Sauce)
Serves 4

Piperrada, like romesco, is one of the Spanish sauces that has made it beyond Spanish restaurants and can be frequently found in all sorts of places. To complement pork chops, which at their best have a healthy layer of fat, in this variation of our piperrada, we added some extra heat and acid in the form of pickled cherry peppers and a splash of their brine. Fresh oregano replaces the thyme for its more assertive flavor.

A glass of dry cider would be just right here.

For the Piperrada Sauce:
2 red bell peppers
1 yellow bell pepper
1 green bell pepper (optional)
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 yellow onion, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, sliced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup chopped pickled cherry peppers
1/2 cup pickled cherry pepper brine

4 pork chops, about 1 inch thick
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, lightly crushed
5 sprigs fresh thyme

To make the piperrada, preheat the oven to 450°F. On a large baking sheet, toss the bell peppers and the cubanelle pepper, if using, with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and season with salt. Spread the peppers apart on the pan and roast for 20 minutes, or until the skins are nicely charred on all sides, turning once or twice as needed. (You can char the skins more quickly under the broiler or by grilling them; however, I discourage this, as roasting for a longer time makes them sweeter and more tender.) Remove the peppers from the oven and transfer to a bowl. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and set aside to cool.

While the peppers are cooling, in a sauté pan over medium-high heat, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, the onion, and the garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions begin to brown and char slightly. Add the oregano and season with salt and pepper. Pour in the wine and deglaze the pan, scraping up any browned bits from the pan bottom. Stir briefly until the wine has evaporated. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Unwrap the bowl of peppers and peel them, working over the bowl to capture all of the juices trapped inside the peppers and from the condensation in the bowl. Discard the stems and seeds and slice the peppers. Add the roasted peppers and sliced cherry peppers to the onion mixture in the sauté pan and return to medium-high heat. Strain the pepper juices left in the bowl to remove any seeds and skins, and add the juice to the pan. Simmer until the liquid is reduced by half, then stir in the cherry pepper brine. Taste and adjust the seasoning. (At this point, you can store the piperrada, in an airtight container in the refrigerator, for up to 3 days.)

Season the pork chops with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a cast-iron or other heavy-bottomed sauté pan over medium-high heat for 2 minutes. Add the olive oil to the hot pan and then the chops. Cook until deeply caramelized on the first side, 4 to 5 minutes. Flip the chops and add the butter, swirling the pan to help it melt. Add the garlic cloves and thyme sprigs, tucking them around the pan.

Raise the heat to high. When the butter foams, baste the pork by tilting the pan towards you so that the butter pools and rapidly, repeatedly spooning the foaming butter all over the chops. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes longer. The chops are done when an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a chop registers 145° to 150°F, or use the thumb test (testing for a medium cook); they should be warm, but not hot, in the center. Transfer the chops to a plate, tent with aluminum foil, and let rest for 5 minutes.

To serve, slice the chops or dish them up whole. Pile the pipperada on top and serve immediately.

Secreto for Lunch

Secreto is a term used for a butcher’s secret cut. Crafted by master artisan Thomas Odermatt, our Secreto, cut from the short loin, brings 200 years of butchering tradition to your table.

When you’re on the run and need some quick ideas for lunch, our Secreto can come in handy.  Use some slices in a sandwich, beef up a healthy salad, or use it as your main ingredient in a pasta.  Here is a quick and delicious tomato based pasta recipe:

Ingredients
1 box Baia pasta, Casarecce
2 14.5oz. can of whole tomatoes
2 tbsp. tomato paste
1 cup water
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 garlic clove, grated on a microplane
2 basil springs
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper

Procedure
1. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan or heavy-bottomed pot. Bloom the grated garlic and tomato paste in the olive oil. When the tomato paste turns into a dark brick red, add the canned tomatoes, breaking them up as they cook. Once all of the tomatoes are crushed to the desired amount, add 1 cup of water and continue to cook. Add the bay leaf, basil sprigs, salt and pepper and allow the tomato sauce to simmer.
2. As the sauce is simmering, fill a 6 quart pot halfway up with hot water and bring it to a boil. When the water is at a rolling boil, add two handfuls of kosher salt and allow it to dissolve. Add 1 box of dry pasta to the boiling water and cook for about twelve minutes (or longer, depending on the desired doneness), stirring occasionally to avoid sticking.
3. For the Secreto: Bring the Secreto to room temperature before you begin. Drizzle cooking oil into a hot pan. Once the pan is smoking hot, sear the fattier side of the Secreto for about four minutes. Carefully flip the Secreto and sear it on the other side for another four minutes. Remove it from the pan and allow it to rest for about five minutes. Although the USDA recommends pork be cooked to an internal temperature of 145ºF, our chefs suggest cooking until a thermometer reads 135ºF as the temp will continue to rise while resting. Slice thin.
4. Strain the pasta when it is cooked to the desired doneness, reserving two cups of the starchy pasta water. Add the strained pasta and Secreto to the tomato sauce, adding pasta water as needed to loosen up the final product.

Secreto in Your Favorite Party Snacks

Secreto is a term used for a butcher’s secret cut. Crafted exclusively for Heritage Foods by master artisan Thomas Odermatt, our Secreto is cut from the short loin and brings 200 years of butchering tradition to your table.

Use the Secreto in your favorite party snacks to impress your guests. When cooked medium rare and sliced thin, the Secreto is the perfect way to top off your spread of finger foods.  Add some to a cheesy nacho platter, throw some on a plain pizza, put them in fun yet elegant lettuce wraps, or use the thin slices of Secreto to top off a bruschetta platter. One pack will go a long way!

Here is a simple recipe to make a quick plate of Bruschetta:

Ingredients
2 baguettes or sourdough bread
2 tomato, diced
1 shallot, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
Basil
Olive oil
Balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper

Procedure
1. Slice baguettes on a slight bias. Dust the slices of bread with olive oil and lightly toast.
2. In a bowl, mix the diced tomatoes, minced shallots, and garlic with salt, pepper, and olive oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let the mix marinate in the refrigerator until you are ready to serve.
3. For the Secreto: Bring the Secreto to room temperature before you begin. Drizzle cooking oil into a hot pan. Once the pan is smoking hot, sear the fattier side of the Secreto for about four minutes. Carefully flip the Secreto and sear it on the other side for another four minutes. Remove it from the pan and allow it to rest for about five minutes. Although the USDA recommends pork be cooked to an internal temperature of 145ºF, our chefs suggest cooking until a thermometer reads 135ºF as the temp will continue to rise while resting. Slice thin.
4. Construct your bruschetta appetizer plate – starting with the tomato mix, top each bite off with a slice of Secreto and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar.

The Best Burger You’ve Ever Had

Great burgers start with great ingredients. We recommend our Akaushi/Angus 8oz burger patties—a perfect combination of robust beefy flavor from the Angus and tender marbling from the Japanese Akaushi. Looking for more ways to up your burger game?  Check out our burger tips below for guaranteed juicy patties every time.

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