Category: Projects


The Carnivore's Manifesto

Heritage Foods founder Patrick Martins Wrote a Book! The Carnivore’s Manifesto

I’ve always known that a book was needed to accumulate all the funny things I’ve experienced over the years working with great people and tasting great foods. I met my co-author Mike Edison while doing a show on the Heritage Radio Network, and I knew I had found a perfect communicator for these ideas.

Update from Heritage Meat Shop

Dick Bessey from Heritage Meat Shop gives us an update on what’s happening at the Essex Street Market:

‘Heritage Meat Shop is the “visible” arm of Heritage Foods USA.  Located in New York City’s Essex Street Market, HMS can provide a selection of meats both from local farmers and from the stocks of Heritage Foods USA.
Two or three times a week we’ll have beef and hogs to break down, and we’ll happily provide custom cuts.  Just give us a call, as these cuts go fast!

Silva Aldo
We’re busy as we head into 2014.  Late last week we demonstrated how our butchers break down a hog and a beef hind quarter.   Here are some photos of Silva, Aldo and Emilie as they ready some wonderful Angus beef and Berkshire pork for you.

Emilie Silva Aldo butcher

Aldo is also training for the next Rocky movie!!

Rocky v hog

We’re also carrying chickens from Snow Dance Farms in upstate New York.  They’re terrifically flavorful tender birds just waiting for you to roast or grill them.
Stop by Essex Market to see what we have in our cases! We’re open every day except Monday and we look forward to helping you!’

Iroquois White Corn Project: Husking Bee

Heritage Foods USA is working with the Iroquois White Corn Project in the Finger Lake Region to revive Iroquois White Corn, an heirloom corn variety, as part of a traditional Native American diet and provide a sustainable market for Haudenosaunee farmers. The very FIRST Husking Bee for Ganondagan’s Iroquois White Corn Project took place on Saturday, Oct. 26. Friends and community members gathered to help harvest, husk and braid the Iroquois White Corn.

Iroquois White Corn is available through Heritage Foods USA in three varieties – hulled white corn, roasted corn flour and white corn flour.

Enjoy some photos from the event!

more picked corn DSC_0032 DSC_0062DSC_0033 DSC_0039 braidinga Drying corn

Iriquois Corn

Iroquois White Corn

Iriquois Corn
Iriquois Corn

Brooklyn, NY (November 1, 2013) Heritage Foods USA is proud to be the sole national distributor of Iroquois White Corn, an heirloom corn variety that has been a traditional staple of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) diet for 2,000 years. Heritage Foods USA is working with the Iroquois White Corn Project in the Finger Lake Region to revive Iroquois White Corn as part of a traditional Native American diet and provide a sustainable market for Haudenosaunee farmers.

 

All Iroquois White Corn Products originate from corn seeds that descended from seeds planted in the 1600s. The seed has been carefully managed and protected by Haudenosaunee farmers for 2,000 years to keep the genetics pure. Iroquois White Corn has not been genetically modified. The Iroquois White Corn is hand harvested, dried, and roasted. Each bag is ground to order to retain its natural freshness.

 

Iroquois White Corn is available through Heritage Foods USA in three varieties – hulled white corn, roasted corn flour and white corn flour. The whole kernel hulled and roasted corn flour are aromatic with a slightly nutty flavor, adding a depth of flavor to your tortillas, corn bread, posole, vegetable soup, muffins or cookies. The fresh white corn flour has an earthy taste, providing a mild alternative for baking. All of the Iroquois White Corn products deliver a whole grain, gluten free alternative to traditional flour.

 

The Iroquois White Corn Project is located at the Ganondagan State Historic Site, the location of a major 17th-century New York State Seneca town and granary. Purchase of this Iroquois White Corn product will support the Friends of Ganondagan, who in turn support Ganondagan State Historic Site.The not-for-profit educational organization educates visitors about the cultural, nutritional, and spiritual importance of white corn to the Haudenosaunee people. Hundreds of years ago, this town was a vibrant center for the Seneca nation and the Iroquois White Corn Project allows for white corn to grow again in those same fields. Experience this Native American traditional food today and support the New York State Iroquois nation.

For more information about Heritage Foods USA and the Iroquois White Corn Project, visit www.HeritageFoodsUSA.com.

Goatober with the Astor Center & Momofuku ssäm bar

Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar
Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar

We celebrated Goatober with our friends at the Astor Center and Momofuku ssäm bar. Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar, did a whole goat butchering demonstration for a group of hungry diners.

He then cooked up two delicious dishes with goat for us to sample and try in our own homes. If you missed the feast, enjoy some of the recipes from Momofuku ssäm bar.

 

 

 

 

Chef Matthew made a enticing Goat Pho that you can try at their restaurant or at home with the following recipe:

Goat Pho
Goat Pho

Ingredients:

Bones from one whole 30lb goat

1 goat loin

4 onions, split and charred

4 heads of garlic, split and charred

4 1-inch of ginger split

4 T kishibori shoyu

4 T high quality mirin

1 tsp black peppercorn

2 pieces star anise

5 pieces clove

3 pieces dried chili

Shanghai noodles

For garnish:

Cilantro

Thai Basil

Bean sprouts

Hon shemeji mushrooms

Directions:

  1. Roast the bones
  2. Cover with cold water and simmer for six hours
  3. Add onions, garlic, and ginger. Simmer for another hour
  4. Strain
  5. Add the shoyu, mirin, peppercorn, star anise, clove, and chili to the stock and allow to infuse for one hour on very low heat
  6. Thinly slice the loins and arrange in a bowl
  7. Garnish the bowl with picked cilantro, thai basil, bean sprouts, hon shemeji mushrooms, and shanghai noodles
  8. Pour the hot broth over

 

You can also celebrate Goatober with one of the Momofuku ssäm bar’s signature dishes, the Goat Ssäm which serves 6-8 people.

Goat Ssäm
Goat Ssäm

 

Goat Shoulder Ingredients:

1 whole bone-in goat leg

1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup plus 1 tablespoon kosher salt

7 tablespoons light-brown sugar

Accompaniments:

1 cup Napa Cabbage Kimchi, for serving

1 cup Napa Cabbage Kimchi, pureed, for serving

1 cup Ginger-Scallion Sauce, for serving (recipe below)

1 cup  Ssäm Sauce, for serving (recipe below)

2 cups steamed short-grain white rice, for serving

3 to 4 heads Bibb lettuce, leaves separated, washed well, and spun dry

Sea salt

Optional

12 oysters, shucked, for serving

  1. Put the goat leg in a roasting pan, ideally one that holds it snugly. Mix together the granulated sugar and 1 cup of the salt in a bowl, then rub the mixture into the meat; discard any excess salt-and-sugar mixture. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and put it in the fridge for at least 4 hours, or overnight.
  2. Heat the oven to 300⁰F. Remove the goat from the refrigerator and discard any juices that have accumulated. Put the goat in the oven and cook for 6 hours, basting with the rendered fat and pan juices every hour. The goat should be tender and yielding at this point – it should offer almost no resistance to the blade of a knife and you should be able to easily pull meat off the shoulder with a fork. Depending on your schedule, you can serve the goat right away or let it rest and mellow out at room temperature for up to an hour.
  3. When ready to serve – sauces are made, oysters are ready to be shucked, lettuce is washed, etc. – turn the oven to 500⁰F.
  4. Stir together the remaining 1 tablespoon salt and the brown sugar and rub the mixture all over the goat. Put it in the oven for 10 to 15 minutes, until the sugar has melted into a crisp, sweet crust.
  5. Serve whole and hot, surrounded with the accompaniments.

 

Goat Chili

Boer Goat Chili by Thyme for Goat

Ingredients (Serves 8 – 10 people)

2 lbs goat meat sliced into small pieces
1 28oz can of crushed tomatoes
1 40oz can of dark red kidney beans, drained
1 6oz can of tomato paste
1 cup onion, diced
1 cup sweet pepper, diced
¼  cup hot peppers, diced (optional)
2 tablespoons garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons cumin
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 cup red wine (this leaves the rest of the bottle for you and your friends)
½  cup brown sugar

Directions

Sauté garlic, onions and peppers In a large pot in olive oil until onions are transparent.

Add sliced goat meat and cook through.

Add crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, wine, brown sugar, cumin and chili powder.

Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add the beans and heat through to meld flavors.

Serve with sour cream, salsa, shredded cheese or chips.  A corn bread or nice crusty bread goes great with this dish.

For more goat recipes, check out our website. 

Goat Schwarma Recipe

heritage goatGoat Schwarma

Recipe from Goat: Meat, Milk, Cheese by Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2011)

You’ll get a main course for six to eight—or stuffed pita pocket sandwiches for many more.

  • 6 medium garlic cloves, peeled, then mashed with the side of a heavy knife or put through a garlic press
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground mace
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons mild paprika
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • One 4-pound (1.8-kg) leg of goat

1. Mix the garlic, olive oil, salt, mace, cardamom, paprika, cinnamon, cumin, and cayenne in a small bowl. Smear it all over the goat leg and set the leg in a big, heavy roasting pan.

2. Set the rack in the oven’s middle and crank the oven up to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). It’ll take about 15 minutes. Leave the goat leg in the pan on the counter the whole time so that the flavors of the spice mixture will begin to infuse the meat at room temperature.

3. Roast the leg in its pan until an instant-read meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat without touching bone registers 160 degrees F (71 degrees C), about 2 hours. Transfer the leg to a carving board and leave it alone for 10 minutes.

4. Now you’ll need to carve it. And doing so with a goat leg can be tricky. Position the leg on your carving board with the meatier side up. Starting at the fatter end of the leg, slice the meat against the grain. If you take a thin slice off the top, you’ll see which way the meat’s fibers are running, sort of like the grain in wood. Now, position the leg so that you’re slicing at a 90-degree angle from the way the “grain” is running. But here’s the tricky part: There are several muscle groups in a leg. Once you get through one, the grain will change and go a different direction in another part. You’ll have to keep turning the leg to slice thin strips against the grain. There’s a little bit of trial and error here, but don’t worry: No one’s going to know the difference if a couple of slices are going with the grain.

For more recipes using goat meat, check out our website. 

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