Category: Chef Recipes


Chuleta de Puerco con Piperrada Picante (Pork Chops with Spicy Pepper Sauce)

Chef Jonah Miller of Huertas in NYC shares a delicious recipe excerpt from his new book The New Spanish: Bites, Feasts, and Drinks with us!

Chuleta de Puerco con Piperrada Picante

(Pork Chops with Spicy Pepper Sauce)
Serves 4

Piperrada, like romesco, is one of the Spanish sauces that has made it beyond Spanish restaurants and can be frequently found in all sorts of places. To complement pork chops, which at their best have a healthy layer of fat, in this variation of our piperrada, we added some extra heat and acid in the form of pickled cherry peppers and a splash of their brine. Fresh oregano replaces the thyme for its more assertive flavor.

A glass of dry cider would be just right here.

For the Piperrada Sauce:
2 red bell peppers
1 yellow bell pepper
1 green bell pepper (optional)
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 yellow onion, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, sliced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup chopped pickled cherry peppers
1/2 cup pickled cherry pepper brine

4 pork chops, about 1 inch thick
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, lightly crushed
5 sprigs fresh thyme

To make the piperrada, preheat the oven to 450°F. On a large baking sheet, toss the bell peppers and the cubanelle pepper, if using, with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and season with salt. Spread the peppers apart on the pan and roast for 20 minutes, or until the skins are nicely charred on all sides, turning once or twice as needed. (You can char the skins more quickly under the broiler or by grilling them; however, I discourage this, as roasting for a longer time makes them sweeter and more tender.) Remove the peppers from the oven and transfer to a bowl. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and set aside to cool.

While the peppers are cooling, in a sauté pan over medium-high heat, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, the onion, and the garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions begin to brown and char slightly. Add the oregano and season with salt and pepper. Pour in the wine and deglaze the pan, scraping up any browned bits from the pan bottom. Stir briefly until the wine has evaporated. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Unwrap the bowl of peppers and peel them, working over the bowl to capture all of the juices trapped inside the peppers and from the condensation in the bowl. Discard the stems and seeds and slice the peppers. Add the roasted peppers and sliced cherry peppers to the onion mixture in the sauté pan and return to medium-high heat. Strain the pepper juices left in the bowl to remove any seeds and skins, and add the juice to the pan. Simmer until the liquid is reduced by half, then stir in the cherry pepper brine. Taste and adjust the seasoning. (At this point, you can store the piperrada, in an airtight container in the refrigerator, for up to 3 days.)

Season the pork chops with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a cast-iron or other heavy-bottomed sauté pan over medium-high heat for 2 minutes. Add the olive oil to the hot pan and then the chops. Cook until deeply caramelized on the first side, 4 to 5 minutes. Flip the chops and add the butter, swirling the pan to help it melt. Add the garlic cloves and thyme sprigs, tucking them around the pan.

Raise the heat to high. When the butter foams, baste the pork by tilting the pan towards you so that the butter pools and rapidly, repeatedly spooning the foaming butter all over the chops. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes longer. The chops are done when an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a chop registers 145° to 150°F, or use the thumb test (testing for a medium cook); they should be warm, but not hot, in the center. Transfer the chops to a plate, tent with aluminum foil, and let rest for 5 minutes.

To serve, slice the chops or dish them up whole. Pile the pipperada on top and serve immediately.

Why a Duck? Ask Dickens!

The best thing about the holidays is always the food, that is, if you are doing it right! As we say here, let nature lead the way — great food is seasonal and should be celebrated in its own time. Look no farther than the books of Charles Dickens and ask why they always seemed to be eating geese at Christmas? Because that is when naturally mating geese and ducks are ready for harvest. It is nature’s way of writing a menu.

Our Aylesbury ducks, by the way, are the most incredible birds ever to make it all the way from London to your table! And their story is one of the best you will hear at the table.

The Aylesbury duck reached its peak popularity in the late 1800s when thousands of ducklings were sent from the town of Aylesbury to London and served by the top restaurants of the day.

Since then, the Aylesbury was crossed with other breeds like the Pekin, which fared better in industrial settings. If it were not for a few dedicated farmers who kept it pure, it is likely the breed would have disappeared for good. The Aylesbury Duck is listed on the Most Endangered List with fewer than 500 breeding birds left in the U.S. We’re proud to be offering these ducks this season — and no matter what you have heard, they are simple to prepare, not much different than roasting a chicken, and they are sure to make you a superstar in the kitchen!

The Aylesbury boasts a bouncy texture and rich, creamy fat. Its robust flavor with nutty and herbaceous notes make this the most flavorful duck on the market today. These ducks are raised outdoors on ponds and pasture with no hormones or antibiotics.

Americans consume less than 1/3 lb. of duck per year but we hope to restore the bird’s presence on the farm and at your dinner table.

Still need convincing? Here’s our recipe for a simple whole roast duck. If you love duck, and want a truly spectacular bird beyond what is even available in restaurants, you can’t possibly go wrong!

Click here for a simple duck recipe.

Split Pea Soup featuring Heritage Cured Ham Shanks

Split Pea Soup featuring Heritage Cured Ham Shanks

Our Cured Ham Shanks are a life-saver for any and all multi-tasking home chefs. My favorite application for this cut is SOUP.  These flavorful shanks are the perfect low-maintenance cut – delicious and easy!

Enjoy this hearty soup with crusty sourdough bread – for our fellow Brooklynites, we are hooked on Roberta’s batard!

Season 7: No Goat Left Behind from Heritage Foods

Heritage Foods is celebrating the seventh year of its annual October goat project, NO GOAT LEFT BEHIND, and the second in the United Kingdom. No Goat Left Behind addresses the growing problem facing New England goat dairies — namely, what to do with male goats….

Grilled Lamb Chops with Chimichurri

Chef Kipp Ramsey, Farm-to-Table Manager of Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, loves his lamb chops prepared simply. No frenching, no fuss—just a quick char on the grill then served with homemade chimichurri sauce.

We have to agree with Kipp. Not only is frenching tedious and time-consuming but when you remove all of that delicious rib meat you end up missing out on the best part! We’re talking about those golden-brown delicious bits, charred to perfection and begging to be eaten straight off the bone.

The Best Burger You’ve Ever Had

Great burgers start with great ingredients. We recommend our Akaushi/Angus 8oz burger patties—a perfect combination of robust beefy flavor from the Angus and tender marbling from the Japanese Akaushi. Looking for more ways to up your burger game?  Check out our burger tips below for guaranteed juicy patties every time.

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