Category: Lamb


Grilled Lamb Chops with Chimichurri

Chef Kipp Ramsey, Farm-to-Table Manager of Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, loves his lamb chops prepared simply. No frenching, no fuss—just a quick char on the grill then served with homemade chimichurri sauce.

We have to agree with Kipp. Not only is frenching tedious and time-consuming but when you remove all of that delicious rib meat you end up missing out on the best part! We’re talking about those golden-brown delicious bits, charred to perfection and begging to be eaten straight off the bone.

Roasted Leg of Lamb

Roasted Leg of Lamb with Potatoes, Apples, & Citrus

Ryan’s recipe sounds delicious!  We love the simplicity of Roasted Leg of Lamb.  Try this recipe for a citrus twist on an old classic.  The key is marinating the meat overnight and cooking the roast low and slow.  This recipe is great in the oven, and also does wonderful on the grill.

Lamb Meatballs, Janet Fletcher

Lamb Meatballs in Warm Yogurt Sauce with Sizzling Red-Pepper Butter

“As promised, I’ve included the delicious (best lamb I’ve ever tasted) recipe by Janet Fletcher, who is one of my heroes. I made this dish with your ground lamb processed for Tamarack Vermont Sheep Farm. I served the lamb and yogurt meatballs over egg noodles and went wild over the flavors.

Grilled Lamb Hearts with Onion Relish

Once you try these lamb hearts, you’ll wonder why you ever paid top dollar for other cuts before. The firm, dense hearts stand up to a number of pairings, and this quick marinade and an easy, bright onion relish set these up for any kind of use. They shine as an entree over asparagus and grits or alongside potatoes and broccoli rabe, but my favorite way to eat them is to take the grilled hearts, slice them up, and mix them with a generous amount of the relish….

Lamb Recipe by Clodagh Mckenna

Summer Lamb with Fennel and Roasted Nectarines | Clodagh McKenna

The aniseed flavor of fennel and the sweetness of rosemary work really well with lamb cutlets, but you could use this marinade for a whole leg of roast lamb. Sweet, roasted nectarines are a great companion to any lamb dish. I coat my nectarines (or peaches) with apple syrup, but you could use a good-quality maple syrup instead. These nectarines could also be served as a dessert with mascarpone or softly whipped cream.

How to French a Rack of Lamb

In butchery, “frenching” is the process of removing all fat, meat, and connective tissue from the rib bones on a rack roast.

Personally, I like to leave all that stuff on when I’m cooking lamb. I love the crispy, fatty bits on the bones, but for the purposes of presentation, frenching is often preferred.

Basic Trimming:

A rack of lamb consists of a loin attached to a series of rib bones. When untrimmed, this loin is covered with a thick layer of fat and connective tissue that should be removed before cooking.

Begin by using your fingers to find the natural seam between the top layer of fat and the rack. Slowly peel away the layer. You may use a paper towel to help grip and a small knife to help free any stubborn connective tissue.

The fat should separate along a natural fault line leaving a thin 1/8th-inch to 1/4th-inch layer next to the meat. Be careful not to get carried away when trimming. The more fat left on a lamb rack, the more flavor will come through!

At this step, your lamb rack is fully trimmed ready to cook. To french the rack, follow the steps below demonstrated for us by Phil Lewis, Chef du Cuisine at Fat Radish.

How to French:

Using your knife, score the membrane along the center of each bone. Place the tip of the knife against the center of the bone about an inch and a half away from the cut end and pull the knife slowly and firmly down away from the eye of the loin. Repeat along each bone.

photo 1 (6)

 

Grip the meat and pull away from the ribs slowly and firmly. You can use a paper towel to get a better grip. the meat should pull cleanly away from the bones. Continue working each rib until all are exposed.

photo 3 (7)

 

Flip the rack over and use your knife to cut away the flap. Discard excess fat, or render if desired.

 

photo 2 (9)

 

If you’re really lucky, the fat and membrane will come cleanly off the bones, leaving them bare and pearly white, but most of the time, little bits of meat and fat will remain behind. These can be removed with the help of a small pairing knife.

photo 1 (8)

 

 

 

To divide rack into smaller chops, stand it on end, starting from the exposed rib end, cut between ribs with a smooth, single stroke. If you don’t get through in one stroke, pick up your knife, photo 2 (8)place it back in the seam, and pull it again. Try to avoid sawing back and forth, which will create jagged edges.

That’s it! It may seem intimidating at first but it just takes a little practice.

Leave any questions in the comments section bellow.

Happy Cooking!

Bacon-wrapped Loin Chops with Salsa Verde by Chef Julia Jaksic of Employees Only, NYC

In Chef Julia’s recipe, lamb plays well off the cured bacon while the salsa verde cuts the pork fat and brightens the loin chops. It’s simple, delicious, and totally satisfying!

Ingredients

Sliced bacon
Romney lamb loin chops
Shallot
Garlic
Anchovies
Parsley
One lemon
Olive oil

Directions

1. Trim lamb chops of any excess fat.
2. Wrap bacon around loin chops covering as much of the meat as possible and secure the bacon with toothpicks.
3. Bake on a sheet pan at 400°F until bacon is crispy, at that point the lamb should be perfectly cooked.

Salsa Verde:
1. Chop equal parts shallot, garlic and anchovies and combine with double the amount of chopped parsley.
2. Mix the chopped ingredients with the zest of one lemon and drizzle with olive oil.

 

julia-jaksicJulia Jaksic is the Executive Chef Employees Only. Her Croatian-American roots continue to inspire her charcuterie and her appreciation for local and seasonal ingredients.

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