Category: Chef Recipes


Cold Weather Heritage Dinners

It’s cold. Colder than it’s been in my five years living on the East Coast.

As much as I would love to stay under a blanket all day, I, like many of you, must feed myself. Here are a two of my favorite easy winter dishes – delicious meals that have the added benefit of heating up your kitchen!

Lasagna

Lasagna

A cheesy, tomato filled dish with a thick, meaty sauce featuring Heritage Ground Pork or Beef is a great dinner with great leftovers for days. Favorite recipes include Butternut Squash and Pork Lasagne from the Food Network and this easy Beef Lasagne from The Pioneer Woman.

Shepherd’s Pie

800px-Shepherds_pie_(6962180559)

Potatoes, cheese, veggies, and meat – what more could you ask for on a cold evening? Alton Brown at the Food Network has an easy recipe featuring ground lamb and BBC Food has a fun alternative featuring beef chilli.

What are some of your favorite cold weather dinners?

 

Iriquois Corn

Iroquois White Corn: Three Sisters Posole Recipe

iwc_field_tassle-landscape_300dpiHeritage Foods USA is proud to be the sole national distributor of Iroquois White Corn, an heirloom corn variety that has been a traditional staple of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) diet for 2,000 years. Heritage Foods USA is working with the Iroquois White Corn Project in the Finger Lake Region to revive Iroquois White Corn as part of a traditional Native American diet and provide a sustainable market for Haudenosaunee farmers.

Iroquois White Corn is available in three varieties – hulled white corn, roasted corn flour and white corn flour. The whole kernel hulled and roasted corn flour are aromatic with a slightly nutty flavor, adding a depth of flavor to your tortillas, corn bread, posole, vegetable soup, muffins or cookies. The fresh white corn flour has an earthy taste, providing a mild alternative for baking.

Recipe from the Angelica Home Kitchen

by Leslie McEachern

Ingredients

1 cup hominy (hulled white corn)
1/2 cup pinto beans
1/2 cup anasazi beans
1/2 cup kidney beans
1/4 cup olive oil
3 chopped onions
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 cinnamon stick
2 whole bay leaves
1 jalpeno pepper, seeded and chopped (rubber gloves advised)
1 1/2 tablespoons ground cumin
3 leaves fresh sage chopped
1/2 cup medium diced celery
3 cups medium diced carrots
3 cups medium diced turnips
3 cups winter squash such as kuri, hubbard, or kabocha, peeled, seeded,
and cubed
1 (32 ounce) can peeled organic tomatoes and their juice
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
chopped cilantro for garnish

Directions

  1. Sort through beans and hominy to discard any broken ones or stones. Place beans and hominy in a 3 to 4 quart saucepan and cover with two quarts of water.
  2. Bring to a boil over a high heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer 2 minutes.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and allow it to sit for one hour so the beans and hominy can swell.
  4. Meanwhile prep the other vegetables.
  5. When the beans and hominy have soaked, drain and rinse them in a strainer. Place them in a 3 to 4 quart pressure cooker with 5 cups of water, bring to pressure, lower heat to simmer and cook for thirty minutes
  6. Place the 1/4 cup olive oil in a stove top casserole over medium heat and sauté the onions, garlic, cinnamon, bay leaves, jalapeno pepper, cumin, and sage, for ten minutes, stirring frequently, then add the remaining vegetables and tomatoes. Reduce heat to low.
  7. Quick release the pressure cooker by running cool water over the top, then add the beans with their cooking liquid to the casserole.
  8. Simmer over low heat, covered for one hour or until everything is tender.
  9. Add salt and pepper to taste and continue to cook another 15-20 minutes or until thickened.
  10. Serve with chopped cilantro.

Cooking time 2 hours, plus one hour for bean soaking.
Yields 6-8 servings

Iroquois White Corn: Hulled White Corn Soup Recipe

IWCP-WholeCorn

Heritage Foods USA is proud to be the sole national distributor of Iroquois White Corn, an heirloom corn variety that has been a traditional staple of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) diet for 2,000 years. Heritage Foods USA is working with the Iroquois White Corn Project in the Finger Lake Region to revive Iroquois White Corn as part of a traditional Native American diet and provide a sustainable market for Haudenosaunee farmers.

Iroquois White Corn is available in three varieties – hulled white corn, roasted corn flour and white corn flour. The whole kernel hulled and roasted corn flour are aromatic with a slightly nutty flavor, adding a depth of flavor to your tortillas, corn bread, posole, vegetable soup, muffins or cookies. Corn soup is one of the most traditional meals you can make with Iroquois hulled white corn.

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Ingredients

2 cups Iroquois White Corn whole hulled white corn
3 cups Anasazi beans
1/2 cup onions
1/2 cup green peppers
1/2 cup mushrooms
1/2 cup tomato sauce
chili powder and other spices to taste

Directions

  1. In a 5-quart slow cooker, cover corn with water. Cook on low for 14 hours. You can also soak overnight, and cook for 2 to 2 1/2 hours.
  2. Cook three cups Anasazi beans according to directions. Add beans to soup after corn is cooked.
  3. Sauté onions, green peppers, and mushrooms. Add to soup.
  4. Add tomato sauce, chili powder, and spices to taste.

For more recipes, please visit: http://iroquoiswhitecorn.org/recipes/

Goatober with the Astor Center & Momofuku ssäm bar

Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar
Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar

We celebrated Goatober with our friends at the Astor Center and Momofuku ssäm bar. Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar, did a whole goat butchering demonstration for a group of hungry diners.

He then cooked up two delicious dishes with goat for us to sample and try in our own homes. If you missed the feast, enjoy some of the recipes from Momofuku ssäm bar.

 

 

 

 

Chef Matthew made a enticing Goat Pho that you can try at their restaurant or at home with the following recipe:

Goat Pho
Goat Pho

Ingredients:

Bones from one whole 30lb goat

1 goat loin

4 onions, split and charred

4 heads of garlic, split and charred

4 1-inch of ginger split

4 T kishibori shoyu

4 T high quality mirin

1 tsp black peppercorn

2 pieces star anise

5 pieces clove

3 pieces dried chili

Shanghai noodles

For garnish:

Cilantro

Thai Basil

Bean sprouts

Hon shemeji mushrooms

Directions:

  1. Roast the bones
  2. Cover with cold water and simmer for six hours
  3. Add onions, garlic, and ginger. Simmer for another hour
  4. Strain
  5. Add the shoyu, mirin, peppercorn, star anise, clove, and chili to the stock and allow to infuse for one hour on very low heat
  6. Thinly slice the loins and arrange in a bowl
  7. Garnish the bowl with picked cilantro, thai basil, bean sprouts, hon shemeji mushrooms, and shanghai noodles
  8. Pour the hot broth over

 

You can also celebrate Goatober with one of the Momofuku ssäm bar’s signature dishes, the Goat Ssäm which serves 6-8 people.

Goat Ssäm
Goat Ssäm

 

Goat Shoulder Ingredients:

1 whole bone-in goat leg

1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup plus 1 tablespoon kosher salt

7 tablespoons light-brown sugar

Accompaniments:

1 cup Napa Cabbage Kimchi, for serving

1 cup Napa Cabbage Kimchi, pureed, for serving

1 cup Ginger-Scallion Sauce, for serving (recipe below)

1 cup  Ssäm Sauce, for serving (recipe below)

2 cups steamed short-grain white rice, for serving

3 to 4 heads Bibb lettuce, leaves separated, washed well, and spun dry

Sea salt

Optional

12 oysters, shucked, for serving

  1. Put the goat leg in a roasting pan, ideally one that holds it snugly. Mix together the granulated sugar and 1 cup of the salt in a bowl, then rub the mixture into the meat; discard any excess salt-and-sugar mixture. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and put it in the fridge for at least 4 hours, or overnight.
  2. Heat the oven to 300⁰F. Remove the goat from the refrigerator and discard any juices that have accumulated. Put the goat in the oven and cook for 6 hours, basting with the rendered fat and pan juices every hour. The goat should be tender and yielding at this point – it should offer almost no resistance to the blade of a knife and you should be able to easily pull meat off the shoulder with a fork. Depending on your schedule, you can serve the goat right away or let it rest and mellow out at room temperature for up to an hour.
  3. When ready to serve – sauces are made, oysters are ready to be shucked, lettuce is washed, etc. – turn the oven to 500⁰F.
  4. Stir together the remaining 1 tablespoon salt and the brown sugar and rub the mixture all over the goat. Put it in the oven for 10 to 15 minutes, until the sugar has melted into a crisp, sweet crust.
  5. Serve whole and hot, surrounded with the accompaniments.

 

Goat Chili

Boer Goat Chili by Thyme for Goat

Ingredients (Serves 8 – 10 people)

2 lbs goat meat sliced into small pieces
1 28oz can of crushed tomatoes
1 40oz can of dark red kidney beans, drained
1 6oz can of tomato paste
1 cup onion, diced
1 cup sweet pepper, diced
¼  cup hot peppers, diced (optional)
2 tablespoons garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons cumin
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 cup red wine (this leaves the rest of the bottle for you and your friends)
½  cup brown sugar

Directions

Sauté garlic, onions and peppers In a large pot in olive oil until onions are transparent.

Add sliced goat meat and cook through.

Add crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, wine, brown sugar, cumin and chili powder.

Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add the beans and heat through to meld flavors.

Serve with sour cream, salsa, shredded cheese or chips.  A corn bread or nice crusty bread goes great with this dish.

For more goat recipes, check out our website. 

Goat Schwarma Recipe

heritage goatGoat Schwarma

Recipe from Goat: Meat, Milk, Cheese by Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2011)

You’ll get a main course for six to eight—or stuffed pita pocket sandwiches for many more.

  • 6 medium garlic cloves, peeled, then mashed with the side of a heavy knife or put through a garlic press
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground mace
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons mild paprika
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • One 4-pound (1.8-kg) leg of goat

1. Mix the garlic, olive oil, salt, mace, cardamom, paprika, cinnamon, cumin, and cayenne in a small bowl. Smear it all over the goat leg and set the leg in a big, heavy roasting pan.

2. Set the rack in the oven’s middle and crank the oven up to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). It’ll take about 15 minutes. Leave the goat leg in the pan on the counter the whole time so that the flavors of the spice mixture will begin to infuse the meat at room temperature.

3. Roast the leg in its pan until an instant-read meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat without touching bone registers 160 degrees F (71 degrees C), about 2 hours. Transfer the leg to a carving board and leave it alone for 10 minutes.

4. Now you’ll need to carve it. And doing so with a goat leg can be tricky. Position the leg on your carving board with the meatier side up. Starting at the fatter end of the leg, slice the meat against the grain. If you take a thin slice off the top, you’ll see which way the meat’s fibers are running, sort of like the grain in wood. Now, position the leg so that you’re slicing at a 90-degree angle from the way the “grain” is running. But here’s the tricky part: There are several muscle groups in a leg. Once you get through one, the grain will change and go a different direction in another part. You’ll have to keep turning the leg to slice thin strips against the grain. There’s a little bit of trial and error here, but don’t worry: No one’s going to know the difference if a couple of slices are going with the grain.

For more recipes using goat meat, check out our website. 

Salt-and-Pepper Rib Eye from The Grilling Book

With Labor Day coming up, there is still time to grill up the perfect steak. You can go crazy with fancy marinades or dry rubs, but I love just a simple steak where you can taste the flavor of the meat. This is a recipe for a beautiful salt and pepper rib eye. You’ll really taste our different beef breeds with this unpretentious preparation. You can thank us later.

Salt-and-Pepper Rib Eye

2 servings

Salt Pepper Ribeye
Salt Pepper Ribeye

Photo credit; Penden + Munk

1 2-lb. bone-in rib-eye steak (1½ to 2 inches thick)

2 tsp. kosher salt, divided

1 tsp. coarsely cracked black peppercorns

Vegetable oil, for brushing

Coarse sea salt

A well-marbled rib eye is so rich and flavorful on its own that it requires nothing more than salt, pepper, and fire. Build a 2-zone fire so you can sear it over hot embers then finish cooking it slowly over medium-low heat to develop a crispy, crunchy steakhouse crust and a juicy interior. If youre working with a boneless rib eye, lower the cooking time by a few minutes.

Put steak on a wire rack set on a rimmed baking sheet. Pat dry with paper towels. Season with . tsp. kosher salt per side. Let stand at room temperature for at least 1 hour. Pat dry with paper towels. Season again with ½ tsp. salt per side; press in ½ tsp. cracked peppercorns per side so pieces adhere.

Build a 2-zone medium-hot/medium-low fire in a charcoal grill, or heat a gas grill to high just before cooking, leaving one burner on low. Brush grill grate with oil. Sear steak over higher heat, flipping once, until nicely charred, 3 to 4 minutes per side. (If a flare-up occurs, use tongs to gently slide the steak to a cooler part of grill.) Move steak to lower heat and continue grilling, flipping once, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Using tongs, lift steak and sear both edges (the bone side and the fat-cap side) for 1 to 2 minutes per side to render out some of the fat. Grill steak to desired temperature, 14 to 18 minutes total or until instant-read thermometer registers 120ÅãF for rare (steak will carry over to 120° F, or medium-rare, as it rests).

Transfer steak to work surface; let rest for 10 minutes. Slice against the grain, season with coarse sea salt.

—From The Grilling Book, The Definitive Guide From Bon Appétit edited by Adam Rapoport/Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC

 

A Million Ways to Make a Meatball

 

Meatballs2I love meatballs. They are tasty and there is a hint of nostalgia to them. But more importantly they are easy to make and can take on any flavor profile you desire. I often cook up a big batch and toss in the freezer for lazy Monday meals. Sometimes I will use beef, but I also love lamb, ground pork, turkey or bison.

 

I’ll take a pound of ground meat and mix up with various herbs for different flavors so I don’t get bored with the meatballs. I’ve made ones with garlic and basil or some with a hint of curry powder. I’ve tried a Moroccan style with a few pinches of cumin, smoked paprika, cinnamon and a large spoonful of harissa (or any hot red pepper paste). Last week I made lamb meatballs with mint, rosemary and a touch of lemon zest.

 

Preheat the oven to 350.  Just grab a big bowl and mix up all the following ingredients:

1 lb ground meat

1 egg (whisk first)

2-3 tablespoons of onion or scallion

1-2 cloves of garlic (I love garlic so put in 2 large ones)

¼ cup of bread crumbs

3 tablespoons of any herb or spice mixture you choose (mine above are with mint and rosemary, but basil or thyme would be delicious. You could also go spicy and do chili or curry powder.)

zest of 1 lemon

pinch of salt and pepper

 

Meatballs1Form your meatballs in any size you choose (I did 20 small meatballs with a pound of meat) and put them on a parchment lined cookie sheet. Bake for about 20 minutes for small meatballs, a touch more if you make them larger. Let them cool completely then freeze in ziplock bags.

 

I was in the mood for Greek so I put the cooked lamb meatballs onto a toasted pita with a yogurt sauce (yogurt and a few drops of lemon juice) and topped with a sprinkle of mint and sea salt. You could also make spaghetti and meatballs a la Lady and the Tramp. Or a meatball sub. Enjoy!

Mama’s Southern-Style Chicken ‘N Dumplings

Mama’s Southern-Style Chicken ‘N Dumplings

Recipe courtesy of Mississippi Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Chicken and dumplings Great American PublishersPhoto Credit:  istockphoto.com • Leslie Banks

If you want a little taste of the south, chicken and dumplings are a good way to go. This would be extra special with homemade chicken broth so be sure to save all the chicken extras and bones you don’t eat to make your chicken stock.

1½ cups flour

½ teaspoon salt

¾ teaspoon baking powder

1½ tablespoons butter

Milk

2 quarts chicken broth

2 to 3 cups cooked shredded chicken

Salt and pepper

Sift flour, salt and baking powder. Cut in butter. Add milk, 1 tablespoon at a time, to bring dough to consistency of pie dough. Roll dough out on floured board to ¼-inch thickness. Cut into strips. Cut strips into 2- to 3-inch lengths. Bring broth to rapid boil. Add chicken then salt and pepper to taste.  Drop dumplings into boiling broth and cook until dumplings float to the top. Taste one to make sure they are no longer “doughy.” You may add butter if you need more fat in the broth.

 

Mississippi Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Great American Publishers

www.GreatAmericanPublishers.com

1.888.854.5954

 

Fried Maple Pork Chops

Fried Maple Pork Chops

Recipe courtesy of Georgia Hometown Cookbook.

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Maple syrup and pork chops are such a beautiful combination of sweet and savory. The crowd favorite heritage pork chops get just that much better with a touch of our Deep Mountain Maple Syrup. Enjoy!

Fried Maple Pork Chops Great American Publishers

Photo Credit:  istockphoto.com • happykimmy

8 (¾-inch thick) pork chops

Maple Syrup

Black pepper

Paprika

All-purpose flour

Minced onion

Spread a very small amount of maple syrup over each pork chop. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and paprika. Dredge lightly in flour and fry in a hot nonstick skillet using a small amount of oil. While cooking, add minced onion. Serve hot. You can substitute your favorite sauce, such as soy sauce or barbecue sauce for the maple syrup, if desired.

 

Georgia Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Great American Publishers

www.GreatAmericanPublishers.com

1.888.854.5954

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