Category: Chef Recipes


Roasted Goat Leg with Peaches, Apples, & Citrus

Roasted Goat always makes an interesting meal that is exotic while still being simple. The key to this recipe is marinating the meat overnight and cooking the roast low and slow.

Ingredients
1 5-7 lb goat leg
1 lb of peaches
(fresh or frozen)
2 medium apples
2 lemons
1 orange
freshly ground
black pepper
kosher salt
2 cups white wine

MARINADE

  1. Zest the lemons and cover the leg with the zest.
  2. Season meat liberally with salt and pepper.
  3. Slice the peaches, apples, and citrus and arrange the slices so the leg is covered from top to bottom.
  4. Wrap tightly with foil and place on a baking sheet.
  5. Allow 24 hours to marinate in the refrigerator.

ROAST

  1. Remove from the refrigerator 2-3 hours before roasting, allowing the leg to come to room temperature.
  2. Pre-heat oven to 250° F.
  3. Unwrap the leg from the foil, and place back on the baking sheet or in a roasting pan if you have one large enough.
  4. Add the fruit and juices from the marinade to the pan. Pour one cup of wine into the bottom of your pan and tent the leg with foil.
  5. Place the leg in the oven and reduce temperature immediately to 200°F.
  6. Roast the leg for 5-6 hours keeping a close watch. When the bottom of the pan is dry add the second cup of wine.
  7. Once the leg reaches an internal temperature of 120° F remove from the oven. Turn the broiler on to high. Allow a few minutes for your broiler to heat up then place the leg uncovered back in the oven to brown.
  8. When the meat reaches 125° F internal temperature remove from the oven, and let rest for 15 minutes.
  9. Slice against the grain & serve.

Split Pea Soup from Mary O’Grady

Nose-to-tail doesn’t just mean eating all the cuts of the animal, it’s also about making the most of each of those cuts. In all aged culinary traditions, especially those with particularly rich peasant foods, the most delicious dishes are the result of several phases of cooking. This recipe is the prime example of creating a meal to be cherished from what would otherwise be considered an off-cut and discarded.

Mary O’Grady provided this recipe and is an old friend and the founder of Slow Food Austin in the early 2000s. Mack is the man behind the lens and drove a taxi in Austin for decades. Now they eat and travel the world.

Rendering ham fat:ham fat

1. Get a lot of ham fat, preferably in pieces about half the size of your palm or larger, and place them in a large saucepan with a big volume of water.

2. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for a couple of hours.

3. Chill until fat congeals on the surface of the liquid.

4. Remove floating connective tissue and scrape off solidified fat into a storage container, or use it immediately .

5. Skim the rest of the fat and store or use. Reserve the broth for soup- or sauce-making.ham carving

6. Fat and broth can be stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Use refrigerated broth within 3 days.

Split Pea Soup with Ham

Serves 8-10

 

Ingredients

4 Tablespoons rendered ham fat or olive oil

1 medium onion, peeled and chopped

4 medium carrots, peeled and diced

Broth from rendering ham fat, plus enough water to bring the volume to 16 cups

2 pounds split peas, picked over to remove any foreign objects

1 ham bone

2 Tablespoons dried thyme

 

To Prepare

1. Melt ham fat over low heat in large soup pot or kettle, or heat olive oil.

split pea2. Add chopped onion and diced carrots. Cover pot and cook gently, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent.

3. Add ham bone, split peas, and ham broth/water mixture. Stir well.

4. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer.

5. Cook over low heat until the peas are soft and the liquid has taken on the deep green color of the peas. Stir occasionally. Expect this to take at least two hours, but the soup really does not take much attention at his stage.

5. When peas are soft, add the thyme and simmer another 30 minutes.

6. Remove ham bone and cut off any remaining ham. Dice the ham and add it back to the pot. Discard the bone.

Salt and pepper can be added at the table according to the individual’s taste.

This soup freezes well.

Party Tips For Easy Entertaining

Steak Tips: Guide For The Perfect Steak

 

Steak cooks in minutes, but a few simple techniques can reliably tip the scale toward perfection.

First, choose wisely. The quality of the meat is the foundation for a good steak.

Ribeye

Pull the steak out of the fridge an hour before cooking to allow the steak to come up to room temperature, which will cut your cook time and allow for better browning. Season liberally with coarse grain salt and pepper at least 40 minutes before cooking. This allows the salt to permeate the meat tenderizing it and drawing out some of the excess moisture. Before the steak is set over heat you want the steak to be dry to the touch, this allows for the best sear.

Pick your cooking method

Over Fire –You have several options to cook your steak over fire – wood, charcoal briquettes, or lump charcoal. Wood will impart a nuance of smoky flavor, but take the most time to prepare for cooking. Briquettes on the other hand are inexpensive and make quick work of getting the fire going. Lump charcoal such as Binchotan (white charcoal) burns very hot and clean and lasts long – it’s my preferred charcoal. But each of these options has its strengths and each can produce a delicious steak. Be sure your heat source is established – the coal bed is prepared to for cooking before beginning.

Over the stovetop – There is no shame in cooking steak in a pan. In fact much of the time a stovetop can be the most convenient option, especially in winter. If cooking over a stovetop use a heavy pan, preferably cast iron. A heavier weight pan will hold heat more evenly and as a result will cook your steak more evenly. You want the pan to be ripping hot, just at the point of smoking, by the time you are ready to place the steak in it. Turn your hood fan on to high (it’s going to get smoky).

Use a thermometer. There is no other way to ensure you have reached your desired temperature and doneness. The thermometer will be very useful for accuracy in all of your meat cookery. At the least it will reduce stress and guesswork.

You also have a choice to flip only once or flip often. The key to caramelization is lack of moisture and direct heat. There are two philosophies. One is to flip only once. The other is to flip every 30 seconds, which will brown the steak and cut the cook time by a third, but requires a powerful heat source. Flipping once is the best option on a less powerful stove or grill.

Finally, Pull your steak off the heat at 5 – 6 degrees less than your desired temperature – the steak will continue to cook and will come up in temperature. Before cutting into the meat, let it rest for 10 – 15 minutes. This will allow the juices to redistribute within the meat. To serve slice the steak against (perpendicular to) the grain. We suggest sharing each steak and slicing ahead of serving. This will allow you to eat better steak more often for less expense.

steak-on-boardShop all of our best steaks

Temperatures

Rare 120°F – 125° F

Medium Rare 130°F – 140°F

Medium 140°F – 150°F

Medium Well 150°F – 160°F

Simple Pan Seared Steak Recipe

Ribeye

1. An hour before cooking pull your steak out of the fridge and allow it to come to room temperature. Position on a rack to encourage airflow around the meat. Season liberally with coarse grain salt and black pepper and let rest for at least 40 minutes before cooking. This will allow the salt to permeate and tenderize the meat. It will also draw out excess moisture. Be certain to pat the meat dry before cooking.

2. Preheat oven to 500°F.

3. Heat cast iron pan over medium high heat until smoking hot. Before you begin cooking be sure to turn your hood fan on high. It’s gonna get smokey but that’s OK! You can’t cook a good steak without making a little smoke.

4. Right before placing the steak in the pan add a tablespoon of oil. Be sure to use one with a high smoke-point such as grapeseed oil. Over a high flame on the stovetop sear steak in pan for 1 – 2 minutes. Flip. Sear second side for 2 minutes. Use tongs to sear fat side of steak for roughly 30 seconds.

5. Place pan in oven for 2 minutes and check temperature with a meat thermometer for desired doneness.

6. Remove steak from pan and allow it to rest for 15 minutes. Slice against the grain. Garnish with finishing salt and serve family style.

Shop all of our best steaks

Temperatures

Rare 120°F – 125°F

Medium Rare 130°F – 140°F

Medium 140°F – 150°F

Medium Well 150°F – 160°F

Thanksgiving Turkey Mistakes

6 Common Thanksgiving Turkey Mistakes

Thanksgiving! There’s no other meal so rewarding yet so anxiety ridden then this once yearly feast. Your heritage turkey is going to be the star of Thanksgiving dinner. Protect your investment and your reputation this year by avoiding these 6 Common Thanksgiving Turkey mistakes!

Glazed Heritage Ham

Our Guide For The Perfect Ham

Glazed Heritage Ham
Honey Mustard Glazed Heritage Ham.

A beautifully cured ham is one of the most convenient, delicious, and versatile additions to any menu. Because cured hams are fully cooked they are able to be enjoyed hot or cold. This allows for easy entertaining while still offering a delicious and impressive centerpiece. Weighing about 11 pounds each, one bone-in ham will serve 18 guests, or as many as 26 when prepared as part of a family style meal.

A cured hams ability to stay fresh in your refrigerator longer then other meats also adds to its convenience and economic value. When sourced thoughtfully from responsible producers, cured ham is a sustainable alternative to deli meats and other daily convenience foods.

Our heritage hams are expertly prepared by the Fantasma family curemasters and have won numerous awards for their flavor and texture. The most important ingredient in our hams is time– both time spent on the farm where our heritage breeds are allowed to grow and mature naturally, and time in the curehouse, where they are patiently cared for and aged.

Our heritage hams are perfectly balanced in flavor and boast a rich buttery texture with a sweet and savory finish. All of our pork is from pasture raised, hormone and antibiotic free animals. The pigs are raised with care using traditional methods guaranteed to produce the very best tasting meat and are processed at a Certified Humane facility.

Our breeds include Berkshire, Red Wattle, Duroc, Gloucestershire Old Spots, Large Black, and Tamworth. Each heritage breed boasts its own flavor profile, and we encourage you to try them all.

Follow our guide bellow for the perfect ham served hot or cold, and leave a comment with your favorite ham tips!

To Serve Warm

Gently warm the ham in a 325° oven with at least 1/2 cup of water, wine, or stock in the pan. You can cover the ham with foil to help ensure it doesn’t dry out. Using a meat thermometer, remove your ham from the oven at 130-135°. Remember, your ham is already cooked; you’re just warming it through.

If you are planning to use a glaze, wait until the last 15-30 minutes of cooking before applying. Any earlier and you’ll risk burning the sugars in the glaze before the ham has time to warm. Heat your ham low and slow, but don’t be afraid to crank it up at the end to get that nice crispy, caramelized bubbling glaze, always being sure to keep a watchful eye the whole time!

PRO TIP: Allow your ham to rest outside of the fridge before cooking. A room temperature ham will require less total cooking time resulting in a juicier ham! And don’t forget– always rest your meat before carving.

To Serve Cold

Our Maple Sugar Cured hams are fully cooked and ready to enjoy. If you are planning to serve your ham at room temperature simply allow it to rest covered on the counter until the initial chill from the fridge has subsided.

PRO TIP: Left over ham will keep in your fridge for 3 weeks, or it can be frozen for up to 6 months.

Buttermilk Roasted Chicken

The Best Buttermilk Roasted Chicken Recipe

Brining chicken in a buttermilk bath before frying it to crispy golden-brown perfection has been a long standing southern tradition, but did you know using buttermilk to brine your chicken will produced juicy, fall off the bone tender result when roasted in your over too!

Grind 2: The Sequel

Cooking is easy. Mother Nature + the skill of a responsible farmer = the only recipe you should ever fuss over.

Rather than filling your shelves with epic recipe books, how about breed charts that describe the gastronomic wonders of every livestock variety? “One 32-ounce flank steak” as the prime mover in a recipe is not enough information for the enlightened carnivore. Where does that beef come from— farm and breed, please! And was it from a happy cow that led a decent cow life, grazing and doing happy cow things? Or was it a prisoner of American industry?

Cattle are a lot more nuanced than you might think. Dig this: Piedmontese and Belgian Blues are the only two breeds of cow that have the “double-muscle” gene, which makes them extraordinarily tender. And these cows are loaded with myostatin, a protein that inhibits muscle differentiation and growth. As a result, you get a supremely tender and delicious cut of beef. Contrast that with the Angus—which has more tooth and is especially good for dry-aging. The Simmental, a Swiss cow originally bred to stand up to thin air in the Alps, requires a serious knife and some sharp incisors when it comes time to eating. But its grain packs a lot of distinct flavor. The Akaushi is tangy with hints of blue cheese and olive oil. It has a rich aged flavor with a long aftertaste.

Being intimate with the supply chain is where it’s at, which is why Heritage Foods USA is an ingredient-based philosophy. Be a friend and fan of the beast. Food is very personal, and knowledge is power. And when it comes right down to it, it’s the meat, not the motion.

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