Category: Pork


Salumi Bolognese Casarecce

This recipe is adapted from Food and Wine’s Pasta with Salumi Bolognese – a smart, efficient, and tasty way to make the most of your salumi ends!

Ingredients
1 box Baia pasta, Casarecce
2 14.5oz. can of whole tomatoes
2 tbsp. tomato paste
2 oz. prosciutto or country ham ends
2 oz. mixed salumi ends
8 oz. ground beef
1 cup red cooking wine
1 cup water
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 garlic clove, grated on a microplane
2 basil springs
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper

Procedure
1. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the salumi, prosciutto, and ground beef to the pot and brown on all sides. Strain excess fat and add the grated garlic and tomato paste, allowing them to toast until the tomato paste becomes a dark brick red. Deglaze the pan with 1 cup of red cooking wine. Then add the canned tomatoes, breaking them up as they cook. Once all of the tomatoes are crushed to the desired amount, add 1 cup of water and continue to cook. Add the bay leaf, basil sprigs, salt and pepper and allow the sauce to simmer.
2. As the sauce is simmering, fill a 6 quart pot halfway up with hot water and bring it to a boil. When the water is at a rolling boil, add two handfuls of kosher salt and allow it to dissolve. Add 1 box of dry pasta to the boiling water and cook for about twelve minutes (or longer, depending on the desired doneness), stirring occasionally to avoid sticking.
3. Strain the pasta when it is cooked to the desired doneness, reserving two cups of the starchy pasta water. Add the strained pasta to the salumi bolognese over low heat and stir, adding pasta water as needed to loosen up the final product.

porkshanks

Braised Pork Shanks for Family Meal at Untitled in NYC

It’s always fun and interesting for us to see what the chefs in our network are cooking up for their off-the-menu Family Meals.  Our chefs from Untitled in NYC have provided the first recipe for our new Family Meal series. Although brining before cooking is not absolutely necessary, we have added their optional instructions on how to brine the shanks for incredible flavor and texture!

In the Kitchen with Executive Chef of Marta Restaurant, NYC, Joe Tarasco

Check out Executive Chef Tarasco, a great supporter of heritage breeds, as he talks meat marbling and cooks a beautiful thick-cut heritage pork chop on the wood-fired grill at Marta!

Chef Joe Tarasco travelled with us on our most recent farm tour.  Click here to see more videos from our trip!

Fatted Calf bacon, now available nationally through Heritage Foods for the very first time.

Fatted Calf bacon is a bacon milestone. This is old-fashioned bacon at its finest, beginning with superior Heritage pigs, and then dry cured with brown sugar, sea salt, and a bit of cayenne – but it’s not too spicy, just well-balanced, and it is smoked over four kinds of wood, two fruit woods and two hardwoods — cherry, apple, mesquite and alderwood — to further balance the smoky flavor. Taylor tells us that “using just the hardwood, the smoke profile is too strong. Using the apple and cherry soften it. It is nicely aromatic, and the brown sugar gives it a really good depth. The cayenne keeps the sweet and salty at bay, gives it a nice note, and you can really taste the meat itself, you can tasted the high quality of the belly…there is nothing like a Heritage pig.”

Fatted Calf was one of Heritage Foods’ first customers on the West Coast — we met them back in 2004 when Patrick Martins was traveling, and they talked about responsible, traditional, humane farming, and reaching out to the like-minded.

“It was an East Bay connection,” recalls Taylor. “Alice Waters may have introduced us, and we immediately knew the pigs were better than anything we could find. At the time we were still doing just one farmer’s market every week, and then we were doing a few, and it just blew up…”

The Fatted Calf bacon is cured with the old-world salt-box method. “It’s a bombardment of cure – it gets massaged into the belly and sits in the box for a few days and gets brushed off. It isn’t scientific ‑ you put some cure down, put in the bellies, and repeat. It couldn’t get any simpler, it is super old-world, how bacon has been made for hundreds of years, but it takes a lot of time. A big company does thousands of pounds in an hour, with liquid injection… ours is more labor intensive, but you wind up with the superior product. There is no added water. When you fry it, it doesn’t disappear.”

These days the butcher’s case in the Fatted Calf has FIFTY different versions of artisanal charcuterie — salumi, sausages, pate, ham, roast beef. “We make everything in small batches and sell it out fast,” says Taylor. “Up until now our business has been a mile wide but an inch deep.”

Dreamy Pork Tenderloin: Put the Skillet in the Oven

Winter is time to leave the oven on. Put a bird or a roast in the pan, surround it with a full compliment of herbs, garlic, and root vegetables, and let the house fill up with the gorgeous aroma of love. That’s why we love winter so much – the house always smells like food!

There aren’t a lot of tricks for making a great roast. But we wanted to share with you one of our favorite methods of cooking a pork tenderloin, not only a house favorite here at Heritage but a never-fail crowd pleaser. When done right it is as elegant as filet mignon, the perfect foundation for dinner parties or just a date for two.

Here’s what we do: Pre heat the oven to 375ºF. Pat the pork tenderloin dry and then hit it liberally with kosher salt and cracked black pepper. Meanwhile, get your cast iron skillet out, coat it with olive oil, and get it hot enough to sear the tenderloin. Sear it on all sides – it takes a little work with the tongs, but make sure it is browned all the way around, turning it so it doesn’t burn. This could take about twelve minutes.

When it’s ready, put the skillet with the tenderloin in the oven. Give it about five minutes and turn the meat over once. While you’re at it, take its temperature. You want to reach an internal temp of 135 degrees for medium, just pink and not at all rare. You should be getting close. Keep an eye on it – it may only take a few more minutes, and don’t be afraid to take its temperature often.

When it’s ready, take it out, tent it with foil, and wait ten minutes before slicing into half inch slices. A two pound loin is enough for four people, or two with enough meat left over for a midnight snack and the world’s greatest sandwich the next day.

How to Cook: Your Heritage Bone-In Pork Loin

One of our favorite products and a true crowd pleaser is the 3-4lb. bone-in pork loin, also known as the 5-rib rack.  Delicious roasted whole or cooked as separate chops, this versatile cut can be enjoyed with varieties of vegetables, sauces, and chutneys!  Here’s a simple guide on how to cook this no-fuss roast to flavor perfection:

Let the 5-rib rack come to room temperature before cooking. Preheat the oven to 450ºF. Season the loin liberally with salt and pepper, or a personal favorite, Omnivore Salt.

Place the loin on a rack in a roasting pan with the fat side facing up and place the pan in the middle of the oven for 15 minutes. Rotate the roast so it can cook to an even golden brown color for another 15 minutes.

Turn the oven down to 350ºF. Check the temperature after 20 minutes of cooking – for a beautiful medium cook, the thermometer should read an internal temperature of 135ºF (although, the USDA recommends pork be cooked to an internal temperature of 145ºF).  Once your roast hits 135ºF, take it out of the oven and let it rest at room temperature for at least twenty minutes.  This will allow the juices in the roast to redistribute themselves and the roast will also continue cooking allowing the temperature to carry-over to around 140ºF.

After 20 minutes of resting, slice the roast and simply serve how you see fit.  On a cold January night, the bone-in pork loin is beautifully complimented by a side of creamy mashed potatoes and some crispy roasted brussels sprouts!

This roast serves 5-8 people.

Tip: Always take the roast out of the oven at 5-10 degrees less than the desired temperature to allow for carry-over cooking during the 20 minute resting period.

 

Sausage Stuffing with Fennel, Apple and Omnivore Salt

We love this Italian take on traditional stuffing from the team at Omnivore Salt!

INGREDIENTS
2 loaves country white bread
2 sticks butter
½ cup chopped sage
3 Lbs sausage
2 cups chopped onion
2 cups chopped celery
2 cup chopped carrots
2 cup chopped fennel
2 bay leaf
2 apples grated
2 cups stock
3 eggs
1 bunch parsley roughly chopped

To prepare the croutons (plan to make them the day before!): Cut the bread into ¾ inch cubes and melt a stick of butter along with some sage. Toss the bread with the herbed butter and season with a few generous pinches of Omnivore Salt. Lie on sheet trays and roast in a 325°F oven until golden in color.

To prepare the stuffing: Melt the other stick of butter in a large pan. Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel. Cover and cook over low heat for about 20 minutes, until nice and soft. In a large pan, cook the sausage over medium heat until nice and browned. Combine vegetables and sausage, then cook together over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Season to taste with Omnivore Salt.

Grate the apples and combine them in a large bowl with the sausage mixture and the sage croutons. Season to taste with Omnivore Salt. Add the eggs, the stock and some parsley.

Loosely stuff into your turkey and cook as instructed.

Place any extra stuffing into a baking dish and cover with foil. Bake at 350°F for 1 hour. After 30 minutes remove the foil and bake uncovered for other 20-30 minutes, until nicely golden brown on top.

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