Category: Pork


Pasta alla Medici

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This week’s recipe showcases our delicious new Baia Pasta and our favorite Heritage Maple Cured Hams (now available in smaller sizes!). They combine to make the perfect Pasta alla Medici!

Ingredients

1 pound of Baia pasta

4 tablespoons of butter

1 small onion diced (about 3/4 cup)

1 tablespoon minced garlic

¾  cup frozen or fresh shelled peas

4oz of diced Heritage Maple Cured ham (about 1 cup)

¼ cup White Wine

1 ½ cups heavy cream

¾ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon fresh cracked pepper

¾ cup grated Parmesan

Begin by cooking the pasta in a large pot per the directions on the box. We have been loving this recipe with our new Baia Sardinians pasta, but it also works great with rigatoni or orecchietti. Drain pasta and set aside.

While the pasta is cooking set a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add 2 tablespoons of butter and sauté the onions until translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Add the garlic and ham to the pan. Cook for another 2 minutes, being careful to watch the garlic so it doesn’t burn. Deglaze the pan by adding white wine and stirring well until the wine is nearly evaporated, about 20-40 seconds. This will free any delicious brown bits at the bottom of the pan and add complexity of flavor. Add the cream, peas, salt, and pepper to the pan. Turn down the heat to medium and let the cream reduce by half, 4 to 5 minutes.

Pour over your pasta in a large serving bowl and toss to combined and sprinkle with grated Parmesan.

Cold Weather Heritage Dinners

It’s cold. Colder than it’s been in my five years living on the East Coast.

As much as I would love to stay under a blanket all day, I, like many of you, must feed myself. Here are a two of my favorite easy winter dishes – delicious meals that have the added benefit of heating up your kitchen!

Lasagna

Lasagna

A cheesy, tomato filled dish with a thick, meaty sauce featuring Heritage Ground Pork or Beef is a great dinner with great leftovers for days. Favorite recipes include Butternut Squash and Pork Lasagne from the Food Network and this easy Beef Lasagne from The Pioneer Woman.

Shepherd’s Pie

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Potatoes, cheese, veggies, and meat – what more could you ask for on a cold evening? Alton Brown at the Food Network has an easy recipe featuring ground lamb and BBC Food has a fun alternative featuring beef chilli.

What are some of your favorite cold weather dinners?

 

A Million Ways to Make a Meatball

 

Meatballs2I love meatballs. They are tasty and there is a hint of nostalgia to them. But more importantly they are easy to make and can take on any flavor profile you desire. I often cook up a big batch and toss in the freezer for lazy Monday meals. Sometimes I will use beef, but I also love lamb, ground pork, turkey or bison.

 

I’ll take a pound of ground meat and mix up with various herbs for different flavors so I don’t get bored with the meatballs. I’ve made ones with garlic and basil or some with a hint of curry powder. I’ve tried a Moroccan style with a few pinches of cumin, smoked paprika, cinnamon and a large spoonful of harissa (or any hot red pepper paste). Last week I made lamb meatballs with mint, rosemary and a touch of lemon zest.

 

Preheat the oven to 350.  Just grab a big bowl and mix up all the following ingredients:

1 lb ground meat

1 egg (whisk first)

2-3 tablespoons of onion or scallion

1-2 cloves of garlic (I love garlic so put in 2 large ones)

¼ cup of bread crumbs

3 tablespoons of any herb or spice mixture you choose (mine above are with mint and rosemary, but basil or thyme would be delicious. You could also go spicy and do chili or curry powder.)

zest of 1 lemon

pinch of salt and pepper

 

Meatballs1Form your meatballs in any size you choose (I did 20 small meatballs with a pound of meat) and put them on a parchment lined cookie sheet. Bake for about 20 minutes for small meatballs, a touch more if you make them larger. Let them cool completely then freeze in ziplock bags.

 

I was in the mood for Greek so I put the cooked lamb meatballs onto a toasted pita with a yogurt sauce (yogurt and a few drops of lemon juice) and topped with a sprinkle of mint and sea salt. You could also make spaghetti and meatballs a la Lady and the Tramp. Or a meatball sub. Enjoy!

Fried Maple Pork Chops

Fried Maple Pork Chops

Recipe courtesy of Georgia Hometown Cookbook.

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Maple syrup and pork chops are such a beautiful combination of sweet and savory. The crowd favorite heritage pork chops get just that much better with a touch of our Deep Mountain Maple Syrup. Enjoy!

Fried Maple Pork Chops Great American Publishers

Photo Credit:  istockphoto.com • happykimmy

8 (¾-inch thick) pork chops

Maple Syrup

Black pepper

Paprika

All-purpose flour

Minced onion

Spread a very small amount of maple syrup over each pork chop. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and paprika. Dredge lightly in flour and fry in a hot nonstick skillet using a small amount of oil. While cooking, add minced onion. Serve hot. You can substitute your favorite sauce, such as soy sauce or barbecue sauce for the maple syrup, if desired.

 

Georgia Hometown Cookbook

by Sheila Simmons & Kent Whitaker

Great American Publishers

www.GreatAmericanPublishers.com

1.888.854.5954

Summer Grilling & Swilling at the Astor Center

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Last week we had the pleasure to provide the meat for a lovely food and wine event at the Astor Center in New York. The event was titled “Grilling and Swilling: Hot Weather Reds and Heritage Meats,” and looked at pairing favorite summer grilling recipes with delicious red wines. The event helped raise money for our friends at Heritage Radio Network.

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Chef Emily Peterson collaborated with wine expert Kimberly Severson to bring us these summer delights!

 

Charred Oregano and Lemon Chicken

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Paired with Lagrein Rosato, Muri Gries 2012 from Alto Adige, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy

Protein: 1 Chicken, cut up into 8 or 10 bone-in service pieces (generally 2 wings, 2 drumsticks, 2 thighs, and 2 or 4 breast pieces)

For the Marinade:

1 lemon

1/3 cup kosher salt

2/3 cup dried oregano

2 cups unoaked white wine

 

1. Melt one cup butter in a small sauce pan. Add the juice of the lemon and turn off the heat

2. In a large bowl, or gallon-sized zip top bag, combine the salt and oregano. Completely coat each piece of chicken in the mixture so that you can barley see any chicken through the coating.

3. Grill the chicken over high heat. As you turn it, basted it with the butter-lemon mixture. Cook until you have good color all the way around. This takes about 15 minutes. It smells amazing and you’ll understand why you’re outside when you see the herb-scented smoke plumes floating over your neighbor’s place.

4. Transfer the chicken to a pot large enough to comfortably hold it all, add the wine and remaining butter-lemon mixture and tightly cover. You can proceed from here either on a gar grill or inside on the stovetop.

5. Cook the chicken over medium-low for about 90 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and falling off the bone.

 

Pork Soulvaki with Tzatziki and Pita

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Paired with Touraine Rouge ‘Les Cots Hauts,’ Mikael Bouges 2010 from Touraine, Loire, France

 

Protein: 2 lbs pork shoulder, cut into two inch cubes

 

For the Marinade:

2 cups red wine

2 tsp dried oregano

2 tsp ground cumin

2 tsp dried thyme

1 tsp cinnamon

6 cloves smashed garlic

kosher salt

Freshly ground pepper

1 whole red onion, peeled, root and stem end removed

 

For the Tzatziki

2 cups grated cucumber, seeds avoided

2 cups full-fat Greek yogurt

½ cup chopped fresh mint leaves

A heavy glug of extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbs finely minced garlic

Kosher salt to taste

 

Serve with 4 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias

1 cup flat –leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Warm pita bread

 

1. combine all the marinade ingredients, including the pork, a large pinch of kosher salt and a few cracks of black pepper in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate at large 2 hours, but preferably overnight.

2. Meanwhile, make the yogurt sauce – stir together all the ingredients, starting with just a pinch of salt, then taste and add more salt if you’d like. Keep cold. This can keep in the fridge for up to a week.

3. Skewer the pork cubes onto wooden or metal skewers (if using wood, make sure the ends don’t poke out form the pork – they’ll burn even if you soak them). Grill over medium-hot, preferably charcoal, but gas will do the job too, 20-25 minutes. Generously baste with the marinade for the first 19 minutes.

4. Arrange the skewers on a pretty serving platter and sprinkle with scallions and parsley. Serve with the cold yogurt sauce and the pita, wrapped in a beautiful tea towel.

 

Korean Beef Bulgolgi Ssambap

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Paired with Lambtusco ‘Il Giullare,’ Roberto Negri 2011 from Lambrusco, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

 

Protein: 2 pounds of sirloin steak sliced very thin across the bias (or boneless short ribs)

 

For the marinade:

2 scallions, thinly sliced

¼ cup sugar

3 Tbs chopped garlic

5 Tbs soy sauce

2 Tbs sesame oil

2 Tbs dry vermouth

1/8 tsp ground black pepper

A dash of Sriracha

 

Serve with whole bib lettuce leaves, Kimchi, Gochujang (Korean chili paste)

 

1. Combine the beef and the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Cover tightly. Refrigerate at least two hours, but preferably overnight.

2. Grill beef on a two zone grill, starting on the very hot side, flipping to the less very hot side. Cook to desired doneness,

 

Serve by placing all of the components in individual serving dishes in the center of the table. Make a wrap, using a lettuce leaf, a piece of bulgogi, kimchi and chili paste. Messy and delicious!

 

 

All-American Slider

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Pair with Lauel Glen !Za Zin 2010 from Lodi, California, USA

 

Protein: 2 pounds Ground Beef seasoned with salt and pepper

 

Fixins’

Potato slider buns

Yellow American Cheese

Ketchup

Iceberg or bib lettuce

Fresh tomato slab

 

1. Form meat into equally-sized balls, then flatten into patties. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper

2. On a two zone grill, grill over hot, then flip and finish to desired doneness.

3. Serve with fixins

 

 

See what else the Astor Center is offering at http://www.astorcenternyc.com

For more from Chef Emily check out www.thegourmandandthepeasant.com and Facebook.com/chefemilyp

And hear Heritage Radio’s Audio Gift Bag here http://www.heritageradionetwork.org/episodes/4483-HRN-Community-Sessions-Episode-165-Astor-Center-Audio-Gift-Bag

 

 

Maple-soy glazed Pork Tenderloin on Sautéed Kale by Chef Scott Benjamin of Four Olives Wine Bar

 

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Ingredients

 

1 Duroc Pork Tenderloins

 

3-4 pounds of Kale

 

1 cup good soy sauce
1 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine from Japan)
1 cup real maple syrup
pinch of red pepper flakes
2 onions quartered
2 carrots peeled and chopped roughly
2T brown sugar
10 green onions with roots cut off
2 chunks of ginger peeled and chopped

 

10 green onions green part only
2T pine nuts
2T olive oil
Sea salt
Black pepper

Directions

Cut ribs out of 3-4 pounds of kale.
Blanch kale in salted water just until tender (about 4 min).
Shock kale in ice water, remove when chilled and squeeze out as much water as possible.

Combine in saucepan:
1 cup good soy sauce
1 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine from Japan)
1 cup real maple syrup
pinch of red pepper flakes
2 onions quartered
2 carrots peeled and chopped roughly
2T brown sugar
10 green onions with roots cut off
2 chunks of ginger peeled and chopped

Bring to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes, strain off solids and reserve sauce.

Combine:
10 green onions green part only
2T pine nuts
2T olive oil
Pinch of salt
Pinch of black pepper

Process in blender, you may need to add a little more olive oil.

Trim any excess fat off of pork, place in cold fry pan and slowly bring up heat.  When fat has rendered off of pork, strain and reserve.

Season pork tenderloins with sea salt and fresh ground black pepper.

Bring a few tablespoons of canola oil to a light smoke in a large nonstick fry pan.

Sear pork until well browned on each side, then kill heat and ladle sauce on top of pork.  Return to medium heat and cook two minutes in the pan.

Transfer pork to a glass baking pan, and place in 400°F oven for a few minutes until internal temperature reaches 145°F (medium) be careful, these large cuts will rise in temp after they are pulled from the oven.

Meanwhile, put a few tablespoons of pork fat in nonstick fry pan and bring to a light smoke. Add Kale, pinch of salt and black pepper, sauté until a little brown is in the edges of the leaves, but still has a bright green color.

Center kale on plate, chop on top, use a spoon to drizzle a little of the sauce around the plate.
Garnish with a little green onion pesto on top

 

image http://www.flickr.com/photos/64443083@N00/8426576724/

Grilled Vietnamese-Style Pork with Asian Herbs

by Chef Erica Wides of the Institute of Culinary Education

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Ingredients

Pork Marinade
Blend in a blender or food processor:
4 cloves garlic, peeled
3 shallots, peeled
2 Tablespoons Chinese rice wine or sake
1 1/2 Tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup fish sauce
1 Tablespoon canola, or peanut oil
1 1/2 pounds boneless pork tenderloin, trimmed and sliced lengthwise in half
Fresh Asian herbs: cilantro, mint, Thai basil
1/2 cup chopped peanuts
sliced cucumbers

For Nuoc Cham, Vietnamese Dressing
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
juice of 3 limes
1/4 cup Thai fish sauce
3 Tablespoons sugar
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
2 Tablespoons shredded carrots

Directions

1. In a shallow dish, combine the pork and the marinade and cover with plastic wrap. Allow pork to marinate at room temperature for 2 hours.
2. Prepare a grill pan, charcoal fire, or broiler.
3. Grill or broil the pork for 10-15 minutes or until an instant read thermometer reads 140.
Transfer the pork to a cutting board, and let it rest 5 minutes. Slice on the diagonal in very thin slices and arrange on a platter. Sprinkle the herbs and peanuts on top and serve with sliced cucumbers and the dressing.

For Nuoc Cham, Vietnamese Dressing:
Mix well to dissolve the sugar, store in the refrigerator. Keeps for 4-5 days

 

Image via http://theaahfactor.com

Roast Pork Belly with Crackling and Gravy by Gwen LA

Spicy Azorean Garlic-Roasted Pork: A Tasty Heritage Recipe

This Portugese-inspired heritage recipe comes courtesy of our friend, Sadie Flateman. Sadie holds a certificate from the Sommelier Society of America and is a wine buyer for 67 Wine, one of the best wine shops in New York.

Living the Sustainable Life: Cooking with Dandelion

For some, living a sustainable life is a far-fetched dream. Many lack access to sustainable recipes, markets, or essential ingredients to make this movement a reality. Recently, our friend Anastasia Plakias of the Brooklyn Grange gave us some delicious ideas for cooking with an unlikely, but easy to find ingredient: Dandelion. Below is Anastasia’s featured recipe, which can be made even tastier using Heritage Pork Jowl. To hear the entire segment from Heritage Radio Network, click here.
Anastasia

 

1lb good quality orecchiette (I’m partial to De Cecco)
Kosher salt
1 tsp olive oil
¼ pound guanciale, cut into ¼” by 1” slices*
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tspn chili flake
½ tablespoon unsalted butter
1 large bunch of dandelions, cleaned and chiffonaded
1 Tbspn flat-leaf parsley, chopped
¼ grated pecorino cheese
Salt and Pepper to taste
*Guanciale is cured pork jowl. Often, bacon is subbed for guanciale in Americanized recipes, which is totally bogus. There’s no excuse to use overpowering smoked bacon in place of the subtler-flavored meat. You can get great guanc here in NYC at the Meat Hook, where they cure theirs in house. Don’t feel like making the trip to Williamsburg? No excuse! Heritage Foods USA will ship their amazing product directly to your door!

Directions:

In a large pot, bring 6 quarts of water to boil, salting liberally (2-3 Tbsp) until briny like seawater. In a colander, dunk the greens into the boiling water and bring back to a boil. Cook for one minute and then plunge into ice water or run under a cold tap.

Add the pasta to the water, stirring so it does not stick together.

While the pasta is cooking, heat the oil in a large sauté pan (preferably non-stick, if you’re lazy like I am) over medium high heat. Add the guanciale, cooking till the fat has been rendered and there’s a bit of brown crustiness around the edges, about 12 minutes. Remove with tongs or a slotted spoon and drain well, squeezing between towels. Reserve until ready to use.

Add the chili flake and garlic and toast for 1-2 minutes, till the garlic begins to turn golden, but not brown. Add butter and greens and sauté for about 2 minutes, till the leaves wilt through. Add salt to taste.

When the pasta is almost a perfect al dente, use a spider to transfer to pan. If you don’t have a spider, you should really go get one, they’re like a dollar in Chinatown. For the purposes of this recipe you can reserve a cup of pasta water and drain the pasta in a colander. The idea is to bring a bit of the cooking water with the pasta into the pan. the heat up to high under the skillet and add the grated cheese, tossing to coat the pasta. Add pasta water as necessary to create a nice emulsification and prevent the dish from getting dry. When all the cheese has been incorporated, toss in the parsley and remove from heat.

Serve immediately with a medium bodied red wine, like a Teroldego.

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