It’s Heritage Turkey Time!

 

Narragansett Turkeys at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch

Narragansett Turkeys at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch

It’s Heritage Turkey Time! Over the past decade, Heritage Foods USA has been a leader in the food revolution in the United States. Selling Heritage Breed Turkeys is just one aspect of our work in supporting American agriculture in the form of traditional family farms, and careful stewardship of our national resources. Nothing exemplifies the spirit of our commitment more than our Heritage birds for Thanksgiving.

We want all our customers to celebrate Thanksgiving with us. We at Heritage have much to be grateful for. With the ongoing support of our customer base, we are able sustain 40 family farms, with more being added every month. We have helped to preserve an area roughly the size of Manhattan for traditional agriculture!

Our turkeys are produced by Frank Reese and his team at Good Shepherd. Frank essentially introduced a gastronomic meaning to the word “heritage” in the English language! While many farmers now use the term, Frank and his team raise the truest example of the original Heritage Turkey: according to the USDA, he remains the only farmer allowed to use the name “Heritage” on his label thanks to certification by the oldest agricultural organization in North America, the American Poultry Association. All Heritage Turkeys are certified to be humanely raised with no antibiotics at all, ever.

Bourbon Red Turkey at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch

Bourbon Red Turkey at Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch

Heritage Turkeys come from bloodlines dating back to the mid 1800s. The unbelievable flavor of the white and dark meat has been heralded by the greatest chefs of our time. So remember to order your Heritage Turkey early!

Heritage Turkeys arrive the Tuesday before Thanksgiving via FedEx. Get yours today!

About leah eden

As a cultural anthropologist who has done a lot of research for the world's largest food companies, Leah knows that food matters. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Cultural Anthropology from Boston University then spent the next 8 years conducting research into how consumers think about health and food issues in American culture. In 2012, Leah said goodbye to Old Bay and hard-shell crabs in Baltimore, MD and moved to Brooklyn, NY to start her Master's degree in Food Studies at New York University.