Tag: Akaushi Beef


The Best Burger You’ve Ever Had

Great burgers start with great ingredients. We recommend our Akaushi/Angus 8oz burger patties—a perfect combination of robust beefy flavor from the Angus and tender marbling from the Japanese Akaushi. Looking for more ways to up your burger game?  Check out our burger tips below for guaranteed juicy patties every time.

wagyu ribeye

What is Wagyu Beef?

The name Wagyu refers to any Japanese breed of beef. Kobe is a type of Wagyu, as is Mishima. For the past decade Heritage Foods has sourced Akaushi, a spectacular breed of Wagyu, arguably the most intensely marbled beef breed in the world. Akaushi is the Japanese Red Cow, a national treasure in Japan….

Short Ribs

Judith’s Akaushi Short Ribs

Judith is a longtime friend, supporter of Heritage Foods USA, and serious cook. She’s shared one of her favorite preparations for Akaushi Short Ribs –

 

Short Ribs

 

1. The ribs have arrived and are beautiful. I just vacuum sealed them and put them in the immersion circulator…I’m going to do a 72 hour 136 degrees (alá Thomas Keller) and then will season and finish them on Saturday. I’m sure they’ll be delicious.

2. After my 72 hour sous vide cook at 136 degrees, I took them out, cooled them down and they’re a beautiful pink…a perfect medium to medium rare. They’re totally tender. I took off the big pieces of fat (between the fat and the bones, I probably lost about 50% of the product), and put the large pieces of meat into vacuum seal bags where I added a red wine reduction sauce, with a little honey mustard. I vacuum sealed them and they’re in the freezer. They’re now ready to eat with just a gentle warming.

The “scraps” of the ribs, or the smaller pieces, I turned into a filling for dumplings. I added sautéed onions and leeks, parsley and a little salt and pepper, pulsed a few times in the food processor and put it back into the fridge to tighten up and chill. WOW what a flavor!

My pasta dough has been resting and I’ll soon be rolling that out to make the dumplings and freeze them.

3. I did make about 100+ small dumplings, froze them, and then ran out of energy.

The next day, I took the remaining 2 cups of short rib filling and tossed it with the fresh fettuccine I rolled from the remaining pasta dough. The flavor of the Akaushi beef was intense, the meat very tender and still pink in color. The sautéed leeks and onion added sweetness, the parsley added fresh herbal notes and texture. A little Omnivore Salt finished it off. I made a point of only warming it gently before tossing it with that delicate fresh pasta, but wanted to avoid re-cooking the product to preserve the sous vide benefit.

What a glorious dinner we had last night as a result! I sprinkled the dish with a little Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese and it was perfect.

It’s Brisket’s time!

Available just in time for St. Patrick’s Day.
March is the season for brisket!
Our brisket is fresh for 1 week only
and comes from 100% uncrossed purebred Akaushi.

FRESH Brisket, one 6lb roast Akaushi
$99

One 6lb Akaushi & One 6lb Simmental Brisket
$155

One 6lb Akaushi, One 6lb Simmental
& One 9lb Piedmontese Brisket
$245

How to cook a steak

By Janani Lee

Akaushi Strip

It doesn’t seem like there should be that much mystery involved in cooking a steak, but it is not as easy as you may think…or maybe it’s way easier and you are just over thinking it. I know that until recently most steaks I cooked were either way over done or stabbed to death with a meat thermometer (usually some combination of the two), but I have since read up on the subject and can confidently grill or pan sear a steak. I consider this a major life accomplishment.

 

So, here are a few simple tips gathered from around the internet and tested in my kitchen:

Start with a good steak. At Heritage we carry Ribeye and NY or Kansas City Strip steaks. Our farmers care about the health of their cattle and the conditions they are kept in and that translates to high quality meat.

Know what you like and don’t get too distracted by lots of labels and titles. Prime, Choice, and Select are all USDA distinctions related to tenderness and marbling – they say nothing about the cow. Organic, grass-fed, and grain finished related to how the cow was raised, but can also indicate how the   beef might be. Grain finished tends to have more marbling and be more tender, while grass-fed may have a more distinct flavor and leaner, more developed muscle. Know what you are looking for in a steak and choose accordingly.

NY_Strip_Steaks

Salt. Salt is important not only for flavor, but also for moisture. Salt draws moisture out of your beef before you cook it, so it browns better (and tastes better)

Use a thermometer. A thermometer is like an x-ray for your steak – it can tell you exactly what’s going on inside.

Rare: 125°F – 130°F
Medium-Rare: 130°F – 135°F
Medium: 140°F – 145°F
Well-Done: 160° and higher

 

Meat continues to cook after you take it off the grill, so remove your steak from the grill or pan when your thermometer is about 5 degrees less than you want it to be.


Rest. Let your steak rest before you eat it that was the juices redistribute. About 5 minutes should do it.

 steak

Check out these other guides from The Food Lab and the Kitchn for more tips:

http://www.thekitchn.com/6-steps-for-grilling-the-best-steak-of-your-life-172700

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/05/how-to-grill-a-steak-guide-food-lab.html

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