Tag: Goatober


True carnivores don’t stop at the top-of-the-line, priciest cuts, they know that some of the greatest pleasures run deep.

Even casual gourmands can be found picking at some pig liver country pate at their local bistro, or even getting a bit recherché with the fois gras or some delicately prepared sweet breads. But for those uninhibited gastronomes for whom big flavors are the name of the game, liver, kidney, tongue, and heart are all as prized as any ingredient.

Offal may need a little more finesse in the skillet than say cooking a steak, but Heritage goat and lamb, especially, offer incredibly profound treats — we love lamb’s liver cooked in sherry and served with garlic mashed potatoes, hearts braised or grilled with chimichuri sauce, and of course, the classic kidney pie.

Europeans have known these secrets for years, but even the more timid Americans are catching on that eating off-cuts is the key to truly sustainable, nose-to-tail dining, and discovering a brave new world of bold flavors that pair with rustic Old World wines, and, especially in colder months, are a cherished as part of the feast. As with so much of the food world, what’s old is new again!

Let’s Talk… Goatober Meatballs for Your Housewarming Party!

Getting ready for housewarming parties can be stressful!  Let me take a small load off of your shoulders by introducing our favorite recipe for a simple and delicious appetizer. Goatober (October) is my favorite month, so in celebration I’ve prepared a quick and no-fuss recipe for you.

For the Goat Meat Balls
3 lbs. ground goat
1 medium white onion, diced
1/2 cup breadcrumbs
2 whole eggs
1/2 bunch parsley, picked and chopped
1/2 bunch marjoram, picked and chopped
2 tbsp. salt, add more if you’d like
2 tbsp. curry powder (our mix is equal parts ground coriander, turmeric, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, nutmeg, cinnamon)
1 tbsp. black pepper
1 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes, optional for an extra kick

For the Labne Sauce
1/2 lb. labne (we picked Arz Labne for this recipe)
1/2 bunch dill, finely chopped
1/2 bunch mint, finely chopped
1 lemon, juiced
Salt to taste

To make the labne sauce, thoroughly mix all of the ingredients in a bowl. So that all of the flavors meld together, mix the sauce together ahead of time – we made ours the day before the event.

Preheat the oven to 450°F
Mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl – we did this with our hands and latex gloves. You can also use a mixer with the paddle attachment. Try to work quickly and efficiently – you want to make sure all of the ingredients are evenly mixed without over-working the meat. Once all of the ingredients are fully incorporated into the ground goat, form walnut-sized balls – don’t worry, the goat meat is so lean that there won’t be much shrinking when baked! Lay the balls out evenly on a baking tray lined with a lightly oiled sheet of parchment paper. Bake in the oven for about 15 minutes. We cooked our goat meatballs under a high broiler for about 12 minutes.
Serve each ball with a dollop of labne sauce!

Braised Goatober Curry

5lb. goat shanks
2 tbsp. cooking oil
1 red onion, sliced
1 small kabocha squash, diced
1 – 40z jar green curry paste
1 bottle Chicken Bone Broth or Beef Bone Broth (we mixed half and half), boiled
1- 13.5 oz can coconut milk

Heat the oil in a small rondeau and brown the goat shanks over medium-high heat. Once the shanks are browned on all sides, remove them and set aside.  In the same rondeau, sweat out the onions until they are cooked through.  Add the kabocha squash dice and brown them on all sides (the dice do not need to be thoroughly cooked just yet). Then, toast the green curry paste in the pot, evenly coating the vegetables.

Re-add the goat shanks to the curry mix and carefully add the boiled bone broth.  If the shanks are not completely covered, add hot water. Bring the braise to a boil and then reduce it down to a simmer.  Allow the braise to simmer for about 90 minutes. At this point, the meat from the shanks should fall off of the bone.  If not, don’t worry, just add more water!  Continue to add water and simmer until the meat is tender enough to shred and fall off of the bone.  Reduce the liquid until it is just looser than your desired consistency – the coconut milk will thicken the curry! Just before removing the braise from the heat, mix in the coconut water.

Serve with coconut rice!


Click through the gallery to see some fun facts!

Season 7: No Goat Left Behind from Heritage Foods

Heritage Foods is celebrating the seventh year of its annual October goat project, NO GOAT LEFT BEHIND, and the second in the United Kingdom. No Goat Left Behind addresses the growing problem facing New England goat dairies — namely, what to do with male goats….

Twig Farm, Goatober

Twig Farm

Twig Farm
Cornwall, VT

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Michael Lee and Emily Sunderman run Twig Farm, a goat dairy specializing in farmstead cheese in West Cornwall, VT. The herd of about thirty-five Alpine goats spends their days grazing on pasture and enjoying fresh hay. The dairy has won many awards for aged raw milk goat cheeses, which Michael produces by hand using traditional techniques and equipment. Emily manages the business and marketing for the farm.

Rainbow Haven Farm Goats

Rainbow Haven Farm

Grahamsville, NY

Rainbow Haven Farm Goats

Rainbow Haven Farm is a small family farm owned by Patricia and James Mercado and their 3 sons, Jimmy, Mikey and Robert. As a family they raise dairy goats, Irish Dexter cattle, Romanov sheep, and Berkshire pigs on 10 acres of pasture in Sullivan County, NY. The resident guardian llama watches over the animals. The goats, cattle, and sheep are all milked and all their babies are then bottle fed – making them all healthy and friendly. Jim says his favorite breed is La Mancha because of their sneaky, comical personalities.

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