Tag: Goatober


American Goat meat.

Goatober is Here!

Americans LOVE cheese. Cheese consumption in the US has TRIPLED since 1970. This trend has been equally true for goat cheese. We’ve also begun to make more artisan cheeses at home here in the States, which is a point of pride for American cheese makers– but there’s still one thing we don’t do a lot of. Eat goat meat….

Goatober with the Astor Center & Momofuku ssäm bar

Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar
Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar

We celebrated Goatober with our friends at the Astor Center and Momofuku ssäm bar. Matthew Rudofker, Chef de Cuisine of Momofuku ssäm bar, did a whole goat butchering demonstration for a group of hungry diners.

He then cooked up two delicious dishes with goat for us to sample and try in our own homes. If you missed the feast, enjoy some of the recipes from Momofuku ssäm bar.

 

 

 

 

Chef Matthew made a enticing Goat Pho that you can try at their restaurant or at home with the following recipe:

Goat Pho
Goat Pho

Ingredients:

Bones from one whole 30lb goat

1 goat loin

4 onions, split and charred

4 heads of garlic, split and charred

4 1-inch of ginger split

4 T kishibori shoyu

4 T high quality mirin

1 tsp black peppercorn

2 pieces star anise

5 pieces clove

3 pieces dried chili

Shanghai noodles

For garnish:

Cilantro

Thai Basil

Bean sprouts

Hon shemeji mushrooms

Directions:

  1. Roast the bones
  2. Cover with cold water and simmer for six hours
  3. Add onions, garlic, and ginger. Simmer for another hour
  4. Strain
  5. Add the shoyu, mirin, peppercorn, star anise, clove, and chili to the stock and allow to infuse for one hour on very low heat
  6. Thinly slice the loins and arrange in a bowl
  7. Garnish the bowl with picked cilantro, thai basil, bean sprouts, hon shemeji mushrooms, and shanghai noodles
  8. Pour the hot broth over

 

You can also celebrate Goatober with one of the Momofuku ssäm bar’s signature dishes, the Goat Ssäm which serves 6-8 people.

Goat Ssäm
Goat Ssäm

 

Goat Shoulder Ingredients:

1 whole bone-in goat leg

1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup plus 1 tablespoon kosher salt

7 tablespoons light-brown sugar

Accompaniments:

1 cup Napa Cabbage Kimchi, for serving

1 cup Napa Cabbage Kimchi, pureed, for serving

1 cup Ginger-Scallion Sauce, for serving (recipe below)

1 cup  Ssäm Sauce, for serving (recipe below)

2 cups steamed short-grain white rice, for serving

3 to 4 heads Bibb lettuce, leaves separated, washed well, and spun dry

Sea salt

Optional

12 oysters, shucked, for serving

  1. Put the goat leg in a roasting pan, ideally one that holds it snugly. Mix together the granulated sugar and 1 cup of the salt in a bowl, then rub the mixture into the meat; discard any excess salt-and-sugar mixture. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and put it in the fridge for at least 4 hours, or overnight.
  2. Heat the oven to 300⁰F. Remove the goat from the refrigerator and discard any juices that have accumulated. Put the goat in the oven and cook for 6 hours, basting with the rendered fat and pan juices every hour. The goat should be tender and yielding at this point – it should offer almost no resistance to the blade of a knife and you should be able to easily pull meat off the shoulder with a fork. Depending on your schedule, you can serve the goat right away or let it rest and mellow out at room temperature for up to an hour.
  3. When ready to serve – sauces are made, oysters are ready to be shucked, lettuce is washed, etc. – turn the oven to 500⁰F.
  4. Stir together the remaining 1 tablespoon salt and the brown sugar and rub the mixture all over the goat. Put it in the oven for 10 to 15 minutes, until the sugar has melted into a crisp, sweet crust.
  5. Serve whole and hot, surrounded with the accompaniments.

 

Goat Chili

Boer Goat Chili by Thyme for Goat

Ingredients (Serves 8 – 10 people)

2 lbs goat meat sliced into small pieces
1 28oz can of crushed tomatoes
1 40oz can of dark red kidney beans, drained
1 6oz can of tomato paste
1 cup onion, diced
1 cup sweet pepper, diced
¼  cup hot peppers, diced (optional)
2 tablespoons garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons cumin
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 cup red wine (this leaves the rest of the bottle for you and your friends)
½  cup brown sugar

Directions

Sauté garlic, onions and peppers In a large pot in olive oil until onions are transparent.

Add sliced goat meat and cook through.

Add crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, wine, brown sugar, cumin and chili powder.

Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add the beans and heat through to meld flavors.

Serve with sour cream, salsa, shredded cheese or chips.  A corn bread or nice crusty bread goes great with this dish.

For more goat recipes, check out our website. 

Goat Schwarma Recipe

heritage goatGoat Schwarma

Recipe from Goat: Meat, Milk, Cheese by Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2011)

You’ll get a main course for six to eight—or stuffed pita pocket sandwiches for many more.

  • 6 medium garlic cloves, peeled, then mashed with the side of a heavy knife or put through a garlic press
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground mace
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons mild paprika
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • One 4-pound (1.8-kg) leg of goat

1. Mix the garlic, olive oil, salt, mace, cardamom, paprika, cinnamon, cumin, and cayenne in a small bowl. Smear it all over the goat leg and set the leg in a big, heavy roasting pan.

2. Set the rack in the oven’s middle and crank the oven up to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). It’ll take about 15 minutes. Leave the goat leg in the pan on the counter the whole time so that the flavors of the spice mixture will begin to infuse the meat at room temperature.

3. Roast the leg in its pan until an instant-read meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat without touching bone registers 160 degrees F (71 degrees C), about 2 hours. Transfer the leg to a carving board and leave it alone for 10 minutes.

4. Now you’ll need to carve it. And doing so with a goat leg can be tricky. Position the leg on your carving board with the meatier side up. Starting at the fatter end of the leg, slice the meat against the grain. If you take a thin slice off the top, you’ll see which way the meat’s fibers are running, sort of like the grain in wood. Now, position the leg so that you’re slicing at a 90-degree angle from the way the “grain” is running. But here’s the tricky part: There are several muscle groups in a leg. Once you get through one, the grain will change and go a different direction in another part. You’ll have to keep turning the leg to slice thin strips against the grain. There’s a little bit of trial and error here, but don’t worry: No one’s going to know the difference if a couple of slices are going with the grain.

For more recipes using goat meat, check out our website. 

What is No Goat Left Behind?

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No Goat Left Behind is a serious effort launched in 2011 by Heritage Foods USA designed to introduce goat meat to American diners and provide a sustainable end market for dairy animals. Without an end market farmers must face difficult choices each spring when the kids are born. [Did you know that most goats have twins or triplets?]

You may also be surprised to learn that goat is the most widely consumed meat in the world with a rich and diverse culinary history. Most American’s have only had goat once or twice, usually in an ethnic restaurant when they where feeling bold. The flavor of our goat is delicate and grassy the cuts are similar in size and composition to lamb.

Goat is a seasonal animal and this October our goal is to sell 1000 animals. Over 14 family farms and almost 100 restaurants have committed to participate in No Goat Left Behind. Our partner farmers will raise their goats to Heritage Foods USA’s specifications, guaranteeing pasture-raised animals with no growth hormones or antibiotics. Our partner chefs will create a cornucopia of delicious dishes and recipes.

Goat dairies are in the business of making cheese. To make cheese you need milk, and to get milk each season the goats must have babies. In a weird way these babies are a bi-product of a farm that is looking to produce milk. The labor and feeding costs of caring for these babies is significant. Since the farm needs the mother’s milk to produce cheese, the babies are fed on expensive milk replacer, a goat version of baby formula. Without a dependable end market for these animals farmers simply cannot take on the financial burden and must face hard choices like selling the animals into the commodity market at a few days old or even killing them at birth.

You can change this reality by purchasing goat meat each fall from a trusted butcher like the Heritage Meat Shop in New York’s Historic Essex Market, eating in a restaurant that participates in the project or buying and cooking some goat yourself through our mail order program. However you choose to participate, we applaud your commitment to shaping a food system we can all be proud of. One that respects the realities our nation’s farmers face and honors the animals we consume.

Click here to purchase this fall http://store.heritagefoodsusa.com/goat-coming-in-october-p977.aspx

Last year participating restaurants included:

New York City: Al Di La, Babbo, Bar Boulud, Back Forty, Becco, Betto, Cleaver Company, Colicchio and Sons, Corsino, Community Food and Drink, Egg, El Almacen, Employees Only, Fatty Crab Downtown, Fatty Cue, Fatty Cue Brooklyn, Fette Sau, Gramercy Tavern, Heritage Meat Shop, Isa, Lincoln, Lupa, Maialino, Má Pechê, Minetta Tavern, Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssam Bar, Momo Sushi, Northern Spy, Otto, Ottomanelli & Sons, Palo Santo, Pulino’s, Purple Yam, Roberta’s, Salumeria Rosi, Spotted Pig, Tia Pol, Union Square Café, Untitled, Vinegar Hill House. 

Bay Area: Americano Restaurant, Bi Rite Market, Celadon, Fatted Calf Napa, Fatted Calf San Francisco, Oliveto, Plate Shop, Universal Cafe. 

Other: Hominy Grill, VA; B & B, Carne Vino, Otto, NV; Lidia’s Kansas City, MO; Quiessence, AZ

A Visit to Consider Bardwell…

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Last weekend I traveled with a group of Heritage Foods and Heritage Radio folks to Consider Bardwell Farm in West Pawlet, VT. The farm makes goat and cow cheeses the have achieved great acclaim from top chefs and cheese connoisseurs. The cheese-makers credit their amazing products to their pasture raised animals and small batch productions that are ages in caves on the farm. The taste of place (what the French call terroir) is exemplified so perfectly in these cheeses and they stand out as the heights of what American cheese-making can be.

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We had the privilege of staying in the small cottage on the farm and learn a little about its history. In 1864 Consider Stebbins Bardwell founded the first cheese-making co-op in Vermont. The farm eventually moved away from its roots, but roughly a century later partners Angela Miller, Russell Glover, and Chris Gray rediscovered the farm’s potential.

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In 2011, Heritage Foods began working with Consider Bardwell and several other local dairy farms in Vermont for our No Goat Left Behind project. We work with these farms to provide a sustainable end market for their male dairy goats and to introduce diners to wonderful flavors goat can offer.

Stay tuned for more information in October…or as we call it Goatober!

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 More on Consider Bardwell Farm

http://www.considerbardwellfarm.com/

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