Tag: Heritage Beef


The Best Burger You’ve Ever Had

Great burgers start with great ingredients. We recommend our Akaushi/Angus 8oz burger patties—a perfect combination of robust beefy flavor from the Angus and tender marbling from the Japanese Akaushi. Looking for more ways to up your burger game?  Check out our burger tips below for guaranteed juicy patties every time.

wagyu ribeye

What is Wagyu Beef?

The name Wagyu refers to any Japanese breed of beef. Kobe is a type of Wagyu, as is Mishima. For the past decade Heritage Foods has sourced Akaushi, a spectacular breed of Wagyu, arguably the most intensely marbled beef breed in the world. Akaushi is the Japanese Red Cow, a national treasure in Japan.

wagyu ribeye
wagyu ribeye steaks, Akaushi/Angus

The first Akaushi cattle arrived to the United States in 1992. Three bulls and eight cows left Japan on a custom equipped Boeing 747, headed for the Texas heartland, where they have been treated as celebrities since day one. Our Akaushi steaks are sourced from the very same family of farms that first brought the breed to the United States.

Purebred Akaushi is the authentic taste of Japanese beef, lighter than you might expect, with a silky quality and a surprising elegance.

Akaushi/Angus steak is a Wagyu that results from cross breeding the revered Akaushi with America’s mighty Angus, creating a profound steak experience. Boasting a bold, classic steak flavor, punctuated with the nuance of perfect marbling, this is our top selling steak.

Beyond the legacy of two great beef cultures — Japan and Texas —it’s also nice to know that Akaushi beef has among the lowest cholesterol of any meat sold in the USA, making these Heritage steaks a healthy indulgence as well as a sure-fire crowd pleasers.

Ribeye Steaks, boneless, Akaushi/Angus four 14-16oz steaks $119
NY Strip Steak, boneless, Akaushi/Angus four 14-16oz steaks $119
Ribeye Steaks, boneless, Pure Akaushi four 12oz steaks $157
NY Strip Steak, boneless, Pure Akaushi four 12oz steaks $157
NY Strip Steak, bone-in, Akaushi/Angus two 18-20oz steaks $99
Porterhouse Steak, Akaushi/Angus one 32oz steak $89
Porterhouse Steak, Akaushi/Angus two 32oz steaks $170 Continue reading “What is Wagyu Beef?”

It’s Brisket’s time!

Available just in time for St. Patrick’s Day.
March is the season for brisket!
Our brisket is fresh for 1 week only
and comes from 100% uncrossed purebred Akaushi.

FRESH Brisket, one 6lb roast Akaushi
$99

One 6lb Akaushi & One 6lb Simmental Brisket
$155

One 6lb Akaushi, One 6lb Simmental
& One 9lb Piedmontese Brisket
$245

Salt-and-Pepper Rib Eye from The Grilling Book

With Labor Day coming up, there is still time to grill up the perfect steak. You can go crazy with fancy marinades or dry rubs, but I love just a simple steak where you can taste the flavor of the meat. This is a recipe for a beautiful salt and pepper rib eye. You’ll really taste our different beef breeds with this unpretentious preparation. You can thank us later.

Salt-and-Pepper Rib Eye

2 servings

Salt Pepper Ribeye
Salt Pepper Ribeye

Photo credit; Penden + Munk

1 2-lb. bone-in rib-eye steak (1½ to 2 inches thick)

2 tsp. kosher salt, divided

1 tsp. coarsely cracked black peppercorns

Vegetable oil, for brushing

Coarse sea salt

A well-marbled rib eye is so rich and flavorful on its own that it requires nothing more than salt, pepper, and fire. Build a 2-zone fire so you can sear it over hot embers then finish cooking it slowly over medium-low heat to develop a crispy, crunchy steakhouse crust and a juicy interior. If youre working with a boneless rib eye, lower the cooking time by a few minutes.

Put steak on a wire rack set on a rimmed baking sheet. Pat dry with paper towels. Season with . tsp. kosher salt per side. Let stand at room temperature for at least 1 hour. Pat dry with paper towels. Season again with ½ tsp. salt per side; press in ½ tsp. cracked peppercorns per side so pieces adhere.

Build a 2-zone medium-hot/medium-low fire in a charcoal grill, or heat a gas grill to high just before cooking, leaving one burner on low. Brush grill grate with oil. Sear steak over higher heat, flipping once, until nicely charred, 3 to 4 minutes per side. (If a flare-up occurs, use tongs to gently slide the steak to a cooler part of grill.) Move steak to lower heat and continue grilling, flipping once, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Using tongs, lift steak and sear both edges (the bone side and the fat-cap side) for 1 to 2 minutes per side to render out some of the fat. Grill steak to desired temperature, 14 to 18 minutes total or until instant-read thermometer registers 120ÅãF for rare (steak will carry over to 120° F, or medium-rare, as it rests).

Transfer steak to work surface; let rest for 10 minutes. Slice against the grain, season with coarse sea salt.

—From The Grilling Book, The Definitive Guide From Bon Appétit edited by Adam Rapoport/Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC

 

The Grilling Book: Jalapeño Cheeseburgers with Bacon

76Burger

Photo credit; Penden + Munk

Grilling is the world’s oldest method of cooking and here at Heritage Foods USA we take it seriously. So, when we saw that Adam Rapoport, editor of Bon Appétit magazine, had compiled a collection of 380 recipes called The Grilling Book: the Definitive Guide from Bon Appétit, our stomachs started to growl. The entire office has been drooling over this door-stopper of a book as much because of the beautiful images as the recipes themselves.

Rapoport not only shares some of the most delicious and inspiring recipes from the pages of Bon Appétit, he also offers helpful advice for both the novice and professional grill-master. This is definitely a book you’ll want to keep close to your grill this summer.

One of our staff favorites is the Jalapeño Cheeseburgers with Bacon. This would be delicious with any of our varieties of burger – Angus, Akaushi/Angus, Highland or even Bison. Topped with bacon from any of our five kinds of Heritage Bacon for the perfect summer treat.

Why aren’t you at the grill yet?

Jalapeño Cheeseburgers with Bacon

Makes 8

If you’re a chile hound, here’s one for you. Chopped jalapeño is blended straight into the burgers (if you want to amp up the heat even more, include some of the seeds) and gives spice to the spicy ranch sauce. The burgers gain another layer of flavor from a Worcestershire-coffee glaze that gets brushed on while they grill.

SPICY RANCH SAUCE

4 scallions, finely chopped

1 cup mayonnaise

1 cup sour cream

½ cup chopped fresh cilantro

6 Tbsp. fresh lime juice

2 Tbsp. minced seeded jalapeño

½ tsp. cayenne pepper

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

BURGERS

2 lb. ground beef (20% fat)

1 small onion, chopped (about 1 ¼ cups)

¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce

1 Tbsp. chopped seeded jalapeño

1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

1 tsp. kosher salt

¼ tsp. cayenne pepper

 

WORCESTERSHIRE-COFFEE GLAZE

⅓ cup light corn syrup

2 Tbsp. ketchup

2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce

2 tsp. (packed) light brown sugar

1 tsp. instant coffee powder

3 Tbsp. unsalted butter

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

16 slices bacon

Vegetable oil, for brushing

8 hamburger buns or 3- to 4-inch square focaccia rolls, split horizontally

8 lettuce leaves

2 cups coarsely shredded sharp white cheddar (about 8 oz.)

Assorted additional toppings (such as tomato and grilled onion slices)

 

SAUCE

Whisk first 7 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend. Season sauce with salt and pepper.

BURGERS

Gently mix all ingredients in a large bowl. Form mixture into eight ½- to ¾-inch thick patties. Using your thumb, make a small indentation in the center of each. Place on a small baking sheet. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours and up to 1 day.

GLAZE

Stir first 5 ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat until coffee is dissolved. Remove from heat. Whisk in butter. Season glaze to taste with salt and pepper. Working in batches if necessary, cook bacon in a large skillet over medium high heat until crisp and brown. Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Build a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill, or heat a gas grill to high. Brush grill grate with oil. Toast buns until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer buns, cut side up, to plates. Place lettuce on each bun bottom. Grill burgers for 2 to 3 minutes, basting with glaze. Turn burgers and baste with glaze. Press cheese atop each burger. Grill until cooked to desired doneness, 2 to 3 minutes longer for medium-rare. Spread some sauce on buns and assemble burgers, topping each with 2 slices bacon and additional toppings as desired.

From The Grilling Book: the Definitive Guide from Bon Appétit/Andrews McMeel, LLC

How to cook a steak

By Janani Lee

Akaushi Strip

It doesn’t seem like there should be that much mystery involved in cooking a steak, but it is not as easy as you may think…or maybe it’s way easier and you are just over thinking it. I know that until recently most steaks I cooked were either way over done or stabbed to death with a meat thermometer (usually some combination of the two), but I have since read up on the subject and can confidently grill or pan sear a steak. I consider this a major life accomplishment.

 

So, here are a few simple tips gathered from around the internet and tested in my kitchen:

Start with a good steak. At Heritage we carry Ribeye and NY or Kansas City Strip steaks. Our farmers care about the health of their cattle and the conditions they are kept in and that translates to high quality meat.

Know what you like and don’t get too distracted by lots of labels and titles. Prime, Choice, and Select are all USDA distinctions related to tenderness and marbling – they say nothing about the cow. Organic, grass-fed, and grain finished related to how the cow was raised, but can also indicate how the   beef might be. Grain finished tends to have more marbling and be more tender, while grass-fed may have a more distinct flavor and leaner, more developed muscle. Know what you are looking for in a steak and choose accordingly.

NY_Strip_Steaks

Salt. Salt is important not only for flavor, but also for moisture. Salt draws moisture out of your beef before you cook it, so it browns better (and tastes better)

Use a thermometer. A thermometer is like an x-ray for your steak – it can tell you exactly what’s going on inside.

Rare: 125°F – 130°F
Medium-Rare: 130°F – 135°F
Medium: 140°F – 145°F
Well-Done: 160° and higher

 

Meat continues to cook after you take it off the grill, so remove your steak from the grill or pan when your thermometer is about 5 degrees less than you want it to be.


Rest. Let your steak rest before you eat it that was the juices redistribute. About 5 minutes should do it.

 steak

Check out these other guides from The Food Lab and the Kitchn for more tips:

http://www.thekitchn.com/6-steps-for-grilling-the-best-steak-of-your-life-172700

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/05/how-to-grill-a-steak-guide-food-lab.html

The Angus Breed

Pure Black Angus is the premiere cattle breed for beef in the United States. The breed has ancient origins in Aberdeen and Angus, Scotland. The first Angus bulls arrived in Kansas from Scotland in 1873, garnering negative attention due to their naturally hornless heads. Because only bulls were originally brought over, many cattlemen bred them into existing herds, diluting the genetics. Later, more cows were brought from Scotland to from purebred herds, but it remains difficult to find 100% purebred herds in the US. “Certified Angus Beef” only requires 51% Angus genetics and that the meat and fat ratios are favorable.
Angus is now the most commonly used genetics in America. Black Angus is most common, but a recessive gene makes some cattle Red. Most European and Canadian breeders do not distinguish between Red and Black Angus, but register than as separate breeds in the US. Breeders favor Angus genetics because they are easy to calf and they are naturally hornless.

Highland Cattle: A Regal Heritage Breed

As previously announced, our annual Eighth Cattle Share is in full swing! Following America’s most popular breed, the Angus, Larry and Madonna Sorrell present the truly regal choice of England: Highland beef.

Highland cow
A Highland Cow grazing at Lazy S. Farms

The Highland is the oldest registered breed of cattle, officially recognized in 1884. The Queen of England maintains her own Highland herd at Balmoral Castle, which satisfies her cravings for a royal burger. Highland cattle have lived for centuries in the rugged, remote, Scottish Highlands – qualifying them as a true heritage breed. Cold weather and snow have little effect on this breed, allowing them to be raised as far north as Alaska and Scandinavia.  These extremely harsh conditions propelled the process of natural selection, allowing only the fittest and most adaptable animals to survive and carry on the legacy of the breed. Originally, the Highland breed was comprised of two distinctly different herds; today, however, these strains have evolved into one, hearty Highland lineage. Despite their long horns, long hair, and unusual appearance, the Highland is considered to be a docile and calm animal. They are extremely intelligent, which makes them quite easy to train.

Highland cattle are approximately 2/3 the weight of Angus cattle, so their meat yield is slightly lower. They mature slowly and are typically taken for slaughter later  in life than other breeds, making their meat  tender, lean, well marbled, and flavorful.  This hard-to-find beef is dry-aged three weeks before we ship it, reducing each cut’s weight, but enhancing the savory flavor of this delectable beef.

Larry and Madonna Sorell have been farmers since 1970, when they purchased 200 acres of land in Cloud County, Kansas. Larry Sorell continues a family tradition that was passed down from his grandfather to his father and then, to him. Today, the farm is a bit smaller, but the Sorrells still maintain true biodiversity amongst their livestock. Madonna fondly recalls Larry returning home with a surprise in his truck – once a few lambs, another time a beautiful horse. The couple raises numerous heritage breeds, including a handful of Highland cattle, Katahdin lambs, and several pig varieties, which can be found on our storefront.

 

Eighth Cattle Share

For the fourth year in a row, Heritage Foods USA is taking part in a uniquely sustainable model of meat consumption: the Eighth Cattle Share. Though Heritage supports eating sustainably year-round, this nose-to-tail project allows our customers to purchase an entire eighth of a steer – including all of the cuts – leaving minimal waste in its path. By using the entire cow, small cattle farmers need not worry about selling individual cuts, lifting the heavy burden that comes along with the traditional model of selling cut-by-cut. However, this opportunity also provides our customers with special cuts of heritage cattle breeds at one low price.

Eighth Cattle Angus
Good Farms Pure Black Angus Cattle



Heritage Foods USA considers this project to be one of our most important of the year. For our initial eighth cattle share, we’re teaming up with Craig and Amy Good of Good Farms. Located on the northern edge of the Kansas Flint Hills, this area is the last vestige of the Tall Grass Prairie – a fertile strip of grasslands that supported untold numbers of cattle in our country’s formative years. Grass is arguably the best feed for cows, and the mix of Big Bluestem, Little Bluestem, Indiangrass, Switchgrass, Prairie Dropseed, and Sideoats Grama is responsible for producing the tastiest grass fed, American-bred Angus cattle in existence.

Though Pure Black Angus genetics are the most commonly used in America today, a 100% Angus herd like Craig Good’s is rare and hard to find. Good Farms has become one of the most reputable sources of pure-bred livestock in the country, and we applaud The Goods for caring so much about the quality and integrity of their cattle.

Heritage offers three ways to support this year’s eighth cattle share project, all of which will fit in a standard-sized freezer. Our largest package, the True Eighth, features sixty pounds of ground beef, brisket, short ribs, and three different cuts of steak. For those with a smaller apetite, The All Star Cuts package offers the same prime cuts with significantly less ground beef.

Still, for some, buying in bulk can be a pretty big commitment. Want to support the Eighth Cattle Share project and the small farmers it benefits? Buying ground beef helps these farmers significantly during the butchering process, because virtually any left over parts of the steer can be ground. For this reason, Heritage Foods offers three different ground beef packages, in varying quantities. What better way to prepare for the summer grilling season than by stocking your fridge with the best Angus beef that money can buy?

Stay tuned for additional eighth cattle share packages from Highland, Simmental and Belgian Blue breeds of cattle throughout the summer.

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