Tag: Heritage Breed Pigs


How to Master the Double Cut Tomahawk Chop : An Epic Tale of Pork Chop Wonder

The double cut tomahawk chop looks like something cut by God’s own butcher — it is as powerful a presentation as it is elegant, the kind of thing that makes meat lovers genuflect with love even as they wonder how to cook the darn thing. It’s over two inches thick and it takes some secret knowledge to nail it at a perfect medium while getting all the flavor, juice and texture out of the chop without incineration the outside, without having to go lower slower… the finished product must be seared to perfection, and when cut open, be as pretty and pink as any thing ever to grace your plate. The pay off is huge. You don’t want to screw it up. Don’t worry, we are here to help.

We owe our two-hit technique to Zach Allen, the chef at Carnevino, the Batali and Bastianich citadel of steak out in Las Vegas. These are the same chops they serve there, and at Babbo, and if you’ve ever had the pleasure, the only way to describe the experience is epic. You can plan an afternoon around one of these chops.

First thing: Brine. While not entirely necessary with luscious, healthy, Heritage pork, it definitely helps with these extra-thick cuts to make sure that you won’t dry them out when you put them in the broiler.

 

Brine is easy. We use just salt, and for a minimum of four hours, but you could add a little brown sugar and leave ‘em in the fridge over night.

An alternative to adding that extra bit of sweetness to the brine, is to try a balsamic and sugar glaze to add during the final minutes of cooking – just half a cup of balsamic and about six teaspoons of sugar reduced by about half until the remaining liquid will coat a spoon. Takes about 15 minutes, and you kitchen will smell like vinegar, but can be done way in advance. This will add just a little sweet tang to the chop – not enough to compete with the beautiful taste of the meat, just a note to add a little value to a very thick slice of pork.

For now just dry off the chops and hit them with Kosher salt and ground black pepper.

Now, fire up the iron skillet. Make it smokin’. Begin by searing and rendering the fat cap on these honeys – you can cook them side to side in their own goodness. No need for oil.

Flip them every two minutes or so – the quick flip method encourages more heat through the entire chop, and you’ll start to see a nice crust on the outside. Everything here is done by vibe, but when it looks nice and brown, maybe 8 – 10 mins total cooking, take them out of the pan, and let them rest, tented, for about 10 mins.

That’s the secret. The meat is still cooking, you’ll have a lot less to travel now to get them to medium. Meanwhile, put the pan in the broiler to keep it hot. 

After ten minutes, paint them with a bit of the glaze, return them to the pan, and put then under the broiler. You will be surprised at how fast they cook. Flip them in 4 or 5 minutes and give them another 4 or 5 on the other side before taking them out testing them for doneness with a thermometer. Just north of 120 degrees is where you want to be – don’t forget they’ll cook while they rest. The glaze will have caramelized and is just going to be a sweet kiss, not a big flavor. Set them aside, tent them, give them 8 or ten minutes, and serve with confidence.

After a few rounds with the knife and fork you can separate the two chops right between the bones for an extra round of gnawing. The beauty of these chops is they take much longer to eat than they do to cook and have the odd quality of building the ego of whomever is enjoying them. Serve with heroic, big wine.

Leftovers!

One of the best things about making big dinners is having leftovers for lunch the next day.

Usually, if we have some steak or lamb left over, it is going into a sandwich. But have you thought about making hash? Lamb hash is a very special treat indeed — just like beef hash all you have to do is chop some potatoes and onions and peppers and have at it (you can always find a recipe online if you don’t feel like free-styling)… with lamb you can add a bit of curry, and it still goes great with eggs or just on its own.

Doing unexpected things with the leftovers is the hallmark of a great chef. Ham sandwiches are great, of course, but how about whipping up a cordon blue? And if that ham has a bone-in, you are looking at the beginning of some great soup.

Here’s an easy tip: pretty much all leftover meat is good on pizza.

Here is another: pretty much all leftover meat is great in a taco.

Leftovers are definitely an art form in themselves. But as ever, it all starts with the ingredients!

In the Kitchen with Executive Chef of Marta Restaurant, NYC, Joe Tarasco

Check out Executive Chef Tarasco, a great supporter of heritage breeds, as he talks meat marbling and cooks a beautiful thick-cut heritage pork chop on the wood-fired grill at Marta!

Pork Tenderloin

Dreamy Pork Tenderloin: Put the Skillet in the Oven

There aren’t a lot of tricks for making a great roast. But we wanted to share with you one of our favorite methods of cooking a pork tenderloin, not only a house favorite here at Heritage but a never-fail crowd pleaser. When done right it is as elegant as filet mignon, the perfect foundation for dinner parties or just a date for two….

Maple-soy glazed Pork Tenderloin on Sautéed Kale by Chef Scott Benjamin of Four Olives Wine Bar

 

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Ingredients

 

1 Duroc Pork Tenderloins

 

3-4 pounds of Kale

 

1 cup good soy sauce
1 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine from Japan)
1 cup real maple syrup
pinch of red pepper flakes
2 onions quartered
2 carrots peeled and chopped roughly
2T brown sugar
10 green onions with roots cut off
2 chunks of ginger peeled and chopped

 

10 green onions green part only
2T pine nuts
2T olive oil
Sea salt
Black pepper

Directions

Cut ribs out of 3-4 pounds of kale.
Blanch kale in salted water just until tender (about 4 min).
Shock kale in ice water, remove when chilled and squeeze out as much water as possible.

Combine in saucepan:
1 cup good soy sauce
1 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine from Japan)
1 cup real maple syrup
pinch of red pepper flakes
2 onions quartered
2 carrots peeled and chopped roughly
2T brown sugar
10 green onions with roots cut off
2 chunks of ginger peeled and chopped

Bring to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes, strain off solids and reserve sauce.

Combine:
10 green onions green part only
2T pine nuts
2T olive oil
Pinch of salt
Pinch of black pepper

Process in blender, you may need to add a little more olive oil.

Trim any excess fat off of pork, place in cold fry pan and slowly bring up heat.  When fat has rendered off of pork, strain and reserve.

Season pork tenderloins with sea salt and fresh ground black pepper.

Bring a few tablespoons of canola oil to a light smoke in a large nonstick fry pan.

Sear pork until well browned on each side, then kill heat and ladle sauce on top of pork.  Return to medium heat and cook two minutes in the pan.

Transfer pork to a glass baking pan, and place in 400°F oven for a few minutes until internal temperature reaches 145°F (medium) be careful, these large cuts will rise in temp after they are pulled from the oven.

Meanwhile, put a few tablespoons of pork fat in nonstick fry pan and bring to a light smoke. Add Kale, pinch of salt and black pepper, sauté until a little brown is in the edges of the leaves, but still has a bright green color.

Center kale on plate, chop on top, use a spoon to drizzle a little of the sauce around the plate.
Garnish with a little green onion pesto on top

 

image http://www.flickr.com/photos/64443083@N00/8426576724/

Patrick Martins, Founder & President

It’s the Meat…

Want a hot recipe? Here’s one: choose a lovely, well-sourced piece of meat — from a merchant that you trust, sourced from a farm that you know, and a breed you have come to love, and add fire. Et voila! There’s your recipe. Just remember, the fire is the constant, the meat is the variable. And don’t forget where it came from, so you can do it again.

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