Tag: Heritage Radio Network


Slow Meat Symposium 2015

A vegan, a butcher and a cow walk into a room… And started talking

 

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From Thursday, June 4th through Saturday, June 6th over 200 delegates from 40 states and 12 nations gathered in Denver for roundtable discussions aimed at progressively revitalizing a meat system that is currently wasteful, inhumane, and… well, not as delicious as it could be.

 

  The diverse group included producers, policy makers, distributors, retailers, press, chefs, farmers, & ranchers. Discussions were focused on points of transition and difference, collaboration and future partnerships –the take away was action based.   

  One theme of the conference raised in many conversations was: How do we organize local and regional collaboration to increase the national impact of the better meat movement? To begin, we can support each other through industry – sharing resources and knowledge, and helping to create trade for better meat so it becomes a larger percentage of what’s available on the market. Another discussion central to the conference and Slow Meat movement was: What might we have to forgo as a broader community to have better quality meat available on our tables? Does it mean not eating meat one or two days a week? Does it mean only eating a certain quality of meat? Erin Fairbanks dives into this discussion in Episode 236 of The Farm Report. Changing the way we consume meat might mean spending the same each month on meat as families are now, and just eating less of it. Interpretation of the Better Meat, Less Campaign was a hot discussion amongst delegates.  

 

Producers in attendance wondered if the positioning would discourage consumers from supporting an already small segment of the meat supply chain rather than disrupting the unabated consumption of cheap meats made available by the commodity market.  One aspect of the campaign delegates were able to agree on was that eating Better Meat, Less might also mean moving away from the quick fix of the prized loin to eating more braising cuts, which pack a ton of flavor and are a fortifying addition to vegetable and grain based dishes.

One point well received was that our guiding light should, in part, be supporting the efforts of farmers who are working to improve the flavor of meat, as well as the health of the land and animal.

The Symposium was followed by the Slow Meat Fair, which was open to the public on Saturday. Temple Grandin gave the opening keynote. Temple continues to point out aspects of animal husbandry many of us overlook. Find her insightful keynote speech on Heritage Radio Network.

 

  During the fair Heritage Foods USA collaborated with Steve Kurowski, President of the Colorado Brewer’s Guild, and Great Divide Brewery to produce a breed and brew tasting. At the tasting Mary McCarthy, Director of Operations at Heritage Foods presented historic and breed specific information on Berkshire, Red Wattle, Old Spot, and Tamworth breeds while guests tasted the four breeds of pork side by side. The meats were carefully prepared by Chef Matthew Raiford, who weighed out the same salt and pepper for each loin.  

 

The 3rd Annual Slow Meat is scheduled to be held in 2017, but you can get involved now through your local Slow Food chapter. Visit Slow Meat online for more information.

Sustainability in BBQ from Heritage Radio Network

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When our friends at Heritage Radio Network attended the Big Apple BBQ Block Party the weekend of June 8th, 2013 in New York City, it started a conversation about sustainable sourcing and barbeque. In the past, barbeque was a reflection of what was around in your area. The geography was reflected in the cuisine – you bought what was nearby and cooked it. However, as time went on, the barbeque world moved more towards industrial agriculture. Restaurants across the nation served what customers wanted, not what was necessarily available to them. Go to any BBQ joint and you can get ribs or brisket, so where can everybody in the country get your supply of ribs from? Not your small farmer, but big giants like Smithfield, who also seemed to be a sponsor at the Big Apple Barbeque. Tune-in to learn more about sustainability in BBQ from Heritage Radio Network!

http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/4482-HRN-Prime-Episode-19-In-the-Field-Sustainability-in-BBQ

Heritage Radio Network Hawaiian BBQ Recap

Congrats to our friends at Heritage Radio Network for throwing an incredible Hawaiian BBQ party last night. We, along with several hundred other guests, enjoyed delicious food and drink accompanied by Island tunes. If you missed the annual garden party, enjoy some of our favorite photos.

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© 2013 Brian Eden | brianedenphotography.com

Heritage Radio Network Hawaiian BBQ

Our friends at Heritage Radio Network know a thing or two about parties and pigs. They are currently gearing up for their Hawaiian BBQ Hog Roast which will take place on August 11 in the garden at Roberta’s.

Find out more and get your tickets here http://hrnhawaiianbbq.eventbrite.com/

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More from HRN

Hang out in the ultimate urban garden at Roberta’s Pizza and enjoy a family-style feast that will take you from the mean streets of NYC to the breezy beaches of the Big Island.  We’ll start the night with Hors d’oeuvers from Roberta’s Catering and then we’ll say, “Aloha” to Daniel Delaney of Delaney BBQ. Daniel will be the honorary Pitmaster, slow cooking a delicious Heritage Foods USA hog.  

 

Joining Delaney is an all-star line up of chefs. Chris Bradley of Untitled, Kyle Knall of Maysville, and the Court St. Grocers crew will be making some killer sides to compliment the unctuous pork. La New Yorkina will cap the night with their signature frozen treats.  The Anfora restaurant team will be on hand to mix up cocktails, and Empire Brewing Company will be our exclusive beer sponsor. 

 

Don’t forget to check out the Food + Art Silent Auction during the event. Enjoy a cocktail while bidding on unique food art created by artists Margarita Korol, Erin Jang, Brooke David, Mike Geno and more.

 

Let Tom Douglas Plan your Seattle Foodie Fantasy! Chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Tom Douglas boasts over a dozen restaurants within 10 blocks in downtown Seattle. His menus range from seafood to Northern Italian to a Tibetan dumpling food truck. And he wants you to spend the weekend in his town, his way! This is a man who knows food so you can trust him to treat you right in his adopted city. This fabulous weekend will be raffled away so get a head start and buy your raffle tickets early for your chance to win. $10 per raffle ticket.

Summer Grilling & Swilling at the Astor Center

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Last week we had the pleasure to provide the meat for a lovely food and wine event at the Astor Center in New York. The event was titled “Grilling and Swilling: Hot Weather Reds and Heritage Meats,” and looked at pairing favorite summer grilling recipes with delicious red wines. The event helped raise money for our friends at Heritage Radio Network.

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Chef Emily Peterson collaborated with wine expert Kimberly Severson to bring us these summer delights!

 

Charred Oregano and Lemon Chicken

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Paired with Lagrein Rosato, Muri Gries 2012 from Alto Adige, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy

Protein: 1 Chicken, cut up into 8 or 10 bone-in service pieces (generally 2 wings, 2 drumsticks, 2 thighs, and 2 or 4 breast pieces)

For the Marinade:

1 lemon

1/3 cup kosher salt

2/3 cup dried oregano

2 cups unoaked white wine

 

1. Melt one cup butter in a small sauce pan. Add the juice of the lemon and turn off the heat

2. In a large bowl, or gallon-sized zip top bag, combine the salt and oregano. Completely coat each piece of chicken in the mixture so that you can barley see any chicken through the coating.

3. Grill the chicken over high heat. As you turn it, basted it with the butter-lemon mixture. Cook until you have good color all the way around. This takes about 15 minutes. It smells amazing and you’ll understand why you’re outside when you see the herb-scented smoke plumes floating over your neighbor’s place.

4. Transfer the chicken to a pot large enough to comfortably hold it all, add the wine and remaining butter-lemon mixture and tightly cover. You can proceed from here either on a gar grill or inside on the stovetop.

5. Cook the chicken over medium-low for about 90 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and falling off the bone.

 

Pork Soulvaki with Tzatziki and Pita

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Paired with Touraine Rouge ‘Les Cots Hauts,’ Mikael Bouges 2010 from Touraine, Loire, France

 

Protein: 2 lbs pork shoulder, cut into two inch cubes

 

For the Marinade:

2 cups red wine

2 tsp dried oregano

2 tsp ground cumin

2 tsp dried thyme

1 tsp cinnamon

6 cloves smashed garlic

kosher salt

Freshly ground pepper

1 whole red onion, peeled, root and stem end removed

 

For the Tzatziki

2 cups grated cucumber, seeds avoided

2 cups full-fat Greek yogurt

½ cup chopped fresh mint leaves

A heavy glug of extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbs finely minced garlic

Kosher salt to taste

 

Serve with 4 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias

1 cup flat –leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Warm pita bread

 

1. combine all the marinade ingredients, including the pork, a large pinch of kosher salt and a few cracks of black pepper in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate at large 2 hours, but preferably overnight.

2. Meanwhile, make the yogurt sauce – stir together all the ingredients, starting with just a pinch of salt, then taste and add more salt if you’d like. Keep cold. This can keep in the fridge for up to a week.

3. Skewer the pork cubes onto wooden or metal skewers (if using wood, make sure the ends don’t poke out form the pork – they’ll burn even if you soak them). Grill over medium-hot, preferably charcoal, but gas will do the job too, 20-25 minutes. Generously baste with the marinade for the first 19 minutes.

4. Arrange the skewers on a pretty serving platter and sprinkle with scallions and parsley. Serve with the cold yogurt sauce and the pita, wrapped in a beautiful tea towel.

 

Korean Beef Bulgolgi Ssambap

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Paired with Lambtusco ‘Il Giullare,’ Roberto Negri 2011 from Lambrusco, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

 

Protein: 2 pounds of sirloin steak sliced very thin across the bias (or boneless short ribs)

 

For the marinade:

2 scallions, thinly sliced

¼ cup sugar

3 Tbs chopped garlic

5 Tbs soy sauce

2 Tbs sesame oil

2 Tbs dry vermouth

1/8 tsp ground black pepper

A dash of Sriracha

 

Serve with whole bib lettuce leaves, Kimchi, Gochujang (Korean chili paste)

 

1. Combine the beef and the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Cover tightly. Refrigerate at least two hours, but preferably overnight.

2. Grill beef on a two zone grill, starting on the very hot side, flipping to the less very hot side. Cook to desired doneness,

 

Serve by placing all of the components in individual serving dishes in the center of the table. Make a wrap, using a lettuce leaf, a piece of bulgogi, kimchi and chili paste. Messy and delicious!

 

 

All-American Slider

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Pair with Lauel Glen !Za Zin 2010 from Lodi, California, USA

 

Protein: 2 pounds Ground Beef seasoned with salt and pepper

 

Fixins’

Potato slider buns

Yellow American Cheese

Ketchup

Iceberg or bib lettuce

Fresh tomato slab

 

1. Form meat into equally-sized balls, then flatten into patties. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper

2. On a two zone grill, grill over hot, then flip and finish to desired doneness.

3. Serve with fixins

 

 

See what else the Astor Center is offering at http://www.astorcenternyc.com

For more from Chef Emily check out www.thegourmandandthepeasant.com and Facebook.com/chefemilyp

And hear Heritage Radio’s Audio Gift Bag here http://www.heritageradionetwork.org/episodes/4483-HRN-Community-Sessions-Episode-165-Astor-Center-Audio-Gift-Bag

 

 

What You Need To Know About ANTIBIOTICS

By Katy Keiffer
At the National Food Policy Conference in Washington DC in May 2012, a panel was convened to discuss the use of antibiotics in animal feed, a longstanding practice in industrial livestock production. For reasons that are still not clearly understood, the use of sub-therapeutic antibiotics in animal production spurs accelerated growth, a highly desirable outcome that saves on feed and husbandry costs. But going back as far as 1977, there have been concerns about this particular use of antibiotics and its impact on human health.
Cut to the 21st century, and lo and behold, a raft of antibiotic resistant strains of common bacteria in livestock production have emerged, to the great consternation and concern of the scientific and public health communities.
After literally years of pressure from groups such as Concerned Scientists in the Public Interest, National Resources Defense Council, and others, the FDA has finally come out with “voluntary” guidelines on antibiotic use in animal feed. These were explained at the conference by Bill Flynn, Deputy director for Science Policy at FDA center for Veterinary Medicine.
The focus of these voluntary guidelines is on antibiotics present in medicated feed and water used for growth promotion. Use in feed delivers antibiotics at lower doses and for longer durations, a practice which has more of an impact on growing disease-resistant microbes.
The FDA is seeking pharmaceutical industry compliance in phasing these medications out of animal feed, and implementing a requirement for veterinary oversight in the use of all drugs. Currently when farmers use medicated feed, its called “off-label” usage, and does not require a vet to write a prescription, or monitor levels. The FDA is giving the animal ag industry and the pharmaceutical industry three years to phase in these guidelines. Three years, people!
Flynn’s presentation was rebutted by Caroline de Waal, Director of Concerned Scientists in the Public Interest , who made the obvious points: (1) there are no requirements for the pharmaceutical industry to do their job in altering the drugs (currently the same ones we take) that they sell into veterinary medicines. (2) The industry will transition from using antibiotics as a growth promotant to using antibiotics for “prevention”, thus continuing the abuse of the drugs and a further reduction in their efficacy in treating human illness.
So much for voluntary guidelines. Contact your congressman or the FDA and let them know you want “sub-therapeutic” or “preventive” antibiotic use banned altogether.
Heritage Foods USA does not accept meat from animals treated sub-therapeutically with antibiotics.

Post originally appeared in Heritage Foods USA’s June 2012 Newsletter

Living the Sustainable Life: Cooking with Dandelion

For some, living a sustainable life is a far-fetched dream. Many lack access to sustainable recipes, markets, or essential ingredients to make this movement a reality. Recently, our friend Anastasia Plakias of the Brooklyn Grange gave us some delicious ideas for cooking with an unlikely, but easy to find ingredient: Dandelion. Below is Anastasia’s featured recipe, which can be made even tastier using Heritage Pork Jowl. To hear the entire segment from Heritage Radio Network, click here.
Anastasia

 

1lb good quality orecchiette (I’m partial to De Cecco)
Kosher salt
1 tsp olive oil
¼ pound guanciale, cut into ¼” by 1” slices*
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tspn chili flake
½ tablespoon unsalted butter
1 large bunch of dandelions, cleaned and chiffonaded
1 Tbspn flat-leaf parsley, chopped
¼ grated pecorino cheese
Salt and Pepper to taste
*Guanciale is cured pork jowl. Often, bacon is subbed for guanciale in Americanized recipes, which is totally bogus. There’s no excuse to use overpowering smoked bacon in place of the subtler-flavored meat. You can get great guanc here in NYC at the Meat Hook, where they cure theirs in house. Don’t feel like making the trip to Williamsburg? No excuse! Heritage Foods USA will ship their amazing product directly to your door!

Directions:

In a large pot, bring 6 quarts of water to boil, salting liberally (2-3 Tbsp) until briny like seawater. In a colander, dunk the greens into the boiling water and bring back to a boil. Cook for one minute and then plunge into ice water or run under a cold tap.

Add the pasta to the water, stirring so it does not stick together.

While the pasta is cooking, heat the oil in a large sauté pan (preferably non-stick, if you’re lazy like I am) over medium high heat. Add the guanciale, cooking till the fat has been rendered and there’s a bit of brown crustiness around the edges, about 12 minutes. Remove with tongs or a slotted spoon and drain well, squeezing between towels. Reserve until ready to use.

Add the chili flake and garlic and toast for 1-2 minutes, till the garlic begins to turn golden, but not brown. Add butter and greens and sauté for about 2 minutes, till the leaves wilt through. Add salt to taste.

When the pasta is almost a perfect al dente, use a spider to transfer to pan. If you don’t have a spider, you should really go get one, they’re like a dollar in Chinatown. For the purposes of this recipe you can reserve a cup of pasta water and drain the pasta in a colander. The idea is to bring a bit of the cooking water with the pasta into the pan. the heat up to high under the skillet and add the grated cheese, tossing to coat the pasta. Add pasta water as necessary to create a nice emulsification and prevent the dish from getting dry. When all the cheese has been incorporated, toss in the parsley and remove from heat.

Serve immediately with a medium bodied red wine, like a Teroldego.

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