Tag: Heritage


Braised Goatober Curry

5lb. goat shanks
2 tbsp. cooking oil
1 red onion, sliced
1 small kabocha squash, diced
1 – 40z jar green curry paste
1 bottle Chicken Bone Broth or Beef Bone Broth (we mixed half and half), boiled
1- 13.5 oz can coconut milk

Heat the oil in a small rondeau and brown the goat shanks over medium-high heat. Once the shanks are browned on all sides, remove them and set aside.  In the same rondeau, sweat out the onions until they are cooked through.  Add the kabocha squash dice and brown them on all sides (the dice do not need to be thoroughly cooked just yet). Then, toast the green curry paste in the pot, evenly coating the vegetables.

Re-add the goat shanks to the curry mix and carefully add the boiled bone broth.  If the shanks are not completely covered, add hot water. Bring the braise to a boil and then reduce it down to a simmer.  Allow the braise to simmer for about 90 minutes. At this point, the meat from the shanks should fall off of the bone.  If not, don’t worry, just add more water!  Continue to add water and simmer until the meat is tender enough to shred and fall off of the bone.  Reduce the liquid until it is just looser than your desired consistency – the coconut milk will thicken the curry! Just before removing the braise from the heat, mix in the coconut water.

Serve with coconut rice!

Split Pea Soup featuring Heritage Cured Ham Shanks

Split Pea Soup featuring Heritage Cured Ham Shanks

Our Cured Ham Shanks are a life-saver for any and all multi-tasking home chefs. My favorite application for this cut is SOUP.  These flavorful shanks are the perfect low-maintenance cut – delicious and easy!

Enjoy this hearty soup with crusty sourdough bread – for our fellow Brooklynites, we are hooked on Roberta’s batard!

GOATOBER: Fun Facts

Click through the gallery to see some fun facts!

10 Soup Facts That I Find Interesting (by Patrick Martins)

Soup is a tough subject matter for a meat distributor. So I have accumulated 10 soup facts that I find interesting.

1. Carlo Petrini, the founder of SlowFood, told me the best way to judge a restaurant is to try the soup – there is almost no margin of error when it comes to soup. One can’t dupe on the soup.

2. Soup is the best backdrop for our cured shanks, the best cured cut Heritage sells. We only ever sell the cured fore shank as it’s the perfect size for the cure recipe — hind shanks are so large and don’t take in the cure perfectly.

3. Pea Soup is my favorite and the only soup that can be a meal in and of itself for me. (Plus lentil soup in an emergency).

4. Soup ranks last as a desirable dish on the menu to share with acquaintances.

5. Soup is the last stop of the nose-to-tail gastronomic train — bones from heritage breeds make the best stock in the business. Try our Roli Roti beef broth – it takes days to craft!

6. When soup is served the spoon receives top billing at the dinner table finally overcoming the fork and knife for importance.

7. In the movie Ratatouille, the eponymous mouse got his big break making soup at Gusteau’s, the best restaurant in Paris.

8. Soup satisfies the soul, it’s easy, homey, comforting, flexible and nourishing.

9. Soup can change a life – its curative and inspirational… “The dish that changed my life was tom yum kum. You start with a pot of water, add lemongrass, lime leaves, lime juice, coriander, mushrooms, and shrimp; ten minutes later, you have the most incredible, intense soup.” Jean-Georges Vongerichten

10. Soup is where I learned the alphabet.

-Patrick Martins
Founder & President of Heritage Foods

Let’s talk…SOUP! (by Ben Tansel)

It’s interesting to see that soup can have so many variations and carry so much meaning with different people and different cultures. From matzo ball soup that can cure almost anything to a hearty potato and ham hock soup that warms to the core and energizes a working man. Even the tomato soup served in school cafeterias can hold some sort of importance – a memory, a feeling. Thick, thin, spicy, sweet, meaty the list goes on and on. Some are meant to nourish and some are just meant to scratch that itch that only a hot bowl of soup can scratch. Much has been written on soup from cookbooks to peer reviewed articles pontificating its history. One may see it referenced in every vain of pop culture from movies to sitcoms, even song lyrics. It’s staggering how often soup is referenced when attention is paid. Seinfeld is one such show that made reference in many episodes. Everyone remembers the Soup Nazi! Personally, soup has always been a desired meal and I wonder sometimes if there are any people out that that down right dislike it.

Early in my culinary career I worked for a Bulgarian man in a Bulgarian Bistro. Every day this chef wanted no less than six soups on the menu. It was crazy to me that such a small restaurant was running that many different kinds of soup. Not only were there six at one time, but the repertoire he drew from was so diverse. He explained to me that soup in his country was common at every meal of the day and had to change from season to season. I think it was here, working for this man, that my real love for soup bloomed.

I am fairly confident that in this melange of soups, most of the herbs we used were illegal. Not because it was pot or mind altering in any way. Rather, they were illegal because his spice shelf was full of hand picked herbs and spices brought to the states by friends and family. Tasting each of the different spices on his shelf was exciting and unfamiliar to me then and honestly, I don’t think I have seen them since.
His soup and cooking drew Bulgarian natives from all over the region. There was always someone visiting that came through his doors to say hello. They would get into drunken food laden conversations for hours and hours on end. On their arrival they always brought two things: Rakija, which is essentially brandy, and some dried plant materials in unmarked bags. His eyes would light up when he saw the new spice or herb. Immediately he asked “do you know what we can do with this?” No, was my usual response, I couldn’t possibly know where to start, but I knew it was going to be a soup!

These soups we never a quick process. Some were quick and easy to prep, but the simmering and extracting of flavor took hours and hours. Others were laborious and time consuming. Making sure each component was added at just the right moment. Making hundreds and hundreds of tiny meatballs to be added gently into the stock so they wouldn’t stick together and lose their perfectly round shape. It was the process, the development, the struggle that made me really fond making soups. It was also this struggle that made me fall in love and allowed me to understand why.

– Ben Tansel

Heritage Turkey Premiere: An Interview with Frank Reese

Heritage Turkey Premiere: An Interview with Frank Reese

 

“I have baby turkeys everywhere!”

It’s that time of year, summer in Kansas, and the heat is rising. “Turkeys have to be hatched before June to be ready for Thanksgiving,” says Frank Reese. “But these birds do real well in the heat – they aren’t morbidly obese, so they can handle it. And unlike on an industrial farm, they have trees and shade and get plenty of fresh water… commercial turkeys suffer a lot in the heat. Those birds have been genetically selected to grow as fast as possible.”

“A turkey is no better than the farmer behind it. And the genetics, of course,” says Frank, whose turkeys are one of the only flocks in America to receive certification by the American Poultry Association as purebreds, standards that were set in 1873.

“The biggest thing this year is that we’ve added three new farms to meet a bigger demand. We never seem to have enough — hopefully this year if everything goes well we’ll have twice as many turkeys as last year. But it’s still a drop in the bucket — our four farmers together are going to raise what one big commercial plant will do in a week

“What people don’t realize that when you send turkeys to get processed, they don’t all come out as birds in a bag — some birds are bruised and you can’t sell it as a whole Grade A bird. Truthfully we lose very few turkeys to cosmetic things — but to the big guys, they don’t care as much about their animals because they don’t make money off of whole turkeys, they make money off of deli meat. For an industrial producer, that’s where the money is. For them a whole turkey at Thanksgiving is like a giveaway. But when that turkey you usually sell for 99 cents a pound is instead smoked and put in an eight ounce package that now costs five dollars, you’re now selling that same bird for ten bucks a pound. And that’s why they only sell hens as whole birds — their toms they get up to 40 lbs in 14 weeks and sell as deli meat.”

An industrial turkey farm can get a 20 lb. hen in 12 weeks, or a 40 lb tom in 14 weeks. My hens, in 12 weeks only weigh 7 or 8 lbs – and we won’t process them till 24 or 28 weeks when their live weight is 15-16 lbs. My toms —  in 24 weeks weigh 24 lbs— a commercial factory turkey in that much time would weigh 44 lbs, and they don’t quit growing. They’ll get to 50 – 60 lbs and weigh too much for their legs to carry. I don’t lose any turkeys because of obesity because I haven’t selected them to be so fat that they cant live.

“The industry has made their money off of uniformity… there can be no variance, no difference. My turkeys don’t all come out the same – it is a totally different system.

“All the industrial turkeys have salt water added – they call it flavor enhancers – but sometimes its more than just salt. They figure most people don’t know how to cook a bird properly, and they figure it will keep the turkey from turning into dry leather. The truth is that because they raise these birds so fast and kill them so young, they don’t develop a layer of fat. My birds are harvested at a normal age and maturity, and having that maturity brings taste, flavor, texture. The industry has removed that — what people are used to now, the taste of turkey they think they love, is mostly just added salt.

Long-time Heritage customers know that we got our start selling Frank’s turkeys, and our relationship with him truly is the cornerstone of our business. Frank can count among his fans Alice Waters, who says “These birds are without a doubt the tastiest birds you can possibly serve,” and Mario Batali, who proudly claims “I’ve served these birds for my Thanksgiving every year for the past 12 years and always will.”

Frank is a true hero of the heritage food movement — he is the first and one of the only sustainable commercial farmers to receive certification by the American Poultry Association, and the USDA, for his birds as purebreds— and he has been featured in publications ranging from The New York Times to National Geographic. His story is the Rosetta Stone of sustainable farming, and the reason why when it comes to meat, the word “heritage” is synonymous with “heirloom.” Good Shepherd turkeys are the oldest line of turkey in America, 100 percent antibiotic free, and pasture raised on the Kansas prairie.

Casella’s Prosciutto Speciale!

We are so honored to be partners in the launch of Casella’s Prosciutto Speciale, a unique and delicious addition to the American food scene. Our heritage breed prosciutto is something special, or as The New York Times says “outstanding” — each one celebrates true American flavor.

Casella’s follows a time-honored Italian recipe — happy, healthy pigs, salt and time. Each leg of prosciutto is aged slowly, on the bone. At Casella’s there is no rush. Only a commitment to create a high quality, American-made prosciutto in line with the standards of the Italian prosciutto consortia. The results are consistently gorgeous — juicy, marbled meat with a delicate nutty flavor.

Cesare Casella grew up in a small town in the countryside of Tuscany, where his family ran a little trattoria. As a boy, he awaited the arrival of the norcini, the traveling butchers who came each year to make the salumi. Before he could barely see over the table, he was helping to prepare salumi and would care for it as it hung in the cellar. Since those early days in Lucca, Cesare has welcomed a successful career as a chef in New York City, opening several restaurants, becoming the Dean of Italian Cooking at the ICC, and of course, continuing to make salumi. With Casella’s Salumi Speciali, he hopes to transport you back to the flavors and experiences he knew when he was a boy.

Casella’s is made using only our pasture-raised, antibiotic-free, heritage breed pigs including Red Wattle, Berkshire, Tamworth, Gloucestershire Old Spot, Large Black and Duroc. Each breed of ham has a slightly different flavor.

Click on the links below to visit our storefront:
1. CASELLA’S PROSCIUTTO SPECIALE, Sliced Eight 4oz packs
2. CASELLA’S PROSCIUTTO SPECIALE, Sliced Four 4oz packs
3. CASELLA’S PROSCIUTTO SPECIALE, Whole One 9.5-10lb ham

Secreto for Lunch

Secreto is a term used for a butcher’s secret cut. Crafted by master artisan Thomas Odermatt, our Secreto, cut from the short loin, brings 200 years of butchering tradition to your table.

When you’re on the run and need some quick ideas for lunch, our Secreto can come in handy.  Use some slices in a sandwich, beef up a healthy salad, or use it as your main ingredient in a pasta.  Here is a quick and delicious tomato based pasta recipe:

Ingredients
1 box Baia pasta, Casarecce
2 14.5oz. can of whole tomatoes
2 tbsp. tomato paste
1 cup water
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 garlic clove, grated on a microplane
2 basil springs
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper

Procedure
1. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan or heavy-bottomed pot. Bloom the grated garlic and tomato paste in the olive oil. When the tomato paste turns into a dark brick red, add the canned tomatoes, breaking them up as they cook. Once all of the tomatoes are crushed to the desired amount, add 1 cup of water and continue to cook. Add the bay leaf, basil sprigs, salt and pepper and allow the tomato sauce to simmer.
2. As the sauce is simmering, fill a 6 quart pot halfway up with hot water and bring it to a boil. When the water is at a rolling boil, add two handfuls of kosher salt and allow it to dissolve. Add 1 box of dry pasta to the boiling water and cook for about twelve minutes (or longer, depending on the desired doneness), stirring occasionally to avoid sticking.
3. For the Secreto: Bring the Secreto to room temperature before you begin. Drizzle cooking oil into a hot pan. Once the pan is smoking hot, sear the fattier side of the Secreto for about four minutes. Carefully flip the Secreto and sear it on the other side for another four minutes. Remove it from the pan and allow it to rest for about five minutes. Although the USDA recommends pork be cooked to an internal temperature of 145ºF, our chefs suggest cooking until a thermometer reads 135ºF as the temp will continue to rise while resting. Slice thin.
4. Strain the pasta when it is cooked to the desired doneness, reserving two cups of the starchy pasta water. Add the strained pasta and Secreto to the tomato sauce, adding pasta water as needed to loosen up the final product.

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