Tag: Heritage


Fatted Calf Bacon

Fatted Calf Bacon, Now Available Nationally through Heritage Foods USA for the Very First Time.

Fatted Calf bacon is a bacon milestone. This is old-fashioned bacon at its finest, beginning with superior Heritage pigs, and then dry cured with brown sugar, sea salt, and a bit of cayenne – but it’s not too spicy, just well-balanced, and it is smoked over four kinds of wood, two fruit woods and two hardwoods — cherry, apple, mesquite and alderwood — to further balance the smoky flavor….

Wild Rice

Supporting Native Foods at The Good Food Awards!

Under the call to action Come to the Table. All are Welcome Here, 1000 guests came together this past weekend in San Francisco to award 200 American artisans in 14 categories at the Good Food Awards.

Pork Tenderloin

Dreamy Pork Tenderloin: Put the Skillet in the Oven

There aren’t a lot of tricks for making a great roast. But we wanted to share with you one of our favorite methods of cooking a pork tenderloin, not only a house favorite here at Heritage but a never-fail crowd pleaser. When done right it is as elegant as filet mignon, the perfect foundation for dinner parties or just a date for two….

Roasted Leg of Lamb

Roasted Leg of Lamb with Potatoes, Apples, & Citrus

Ryan’s recipe sounds delicious!  We love the simplicity of Roasted Leg of Lamb.  Try this recipe for a citrus twist on an old classic.  The key is marinating the meat overnight and cooking the roast low and slow.  This recipe is great in the oven, and also does wonderful on the grill.

Roasted Root Veggies

Roasted Root Veggies

So simple, so versatile – easily our favorite winter side dish.

Relatively inexpensive and packed with nutrients, they are a great way to support an independent farmer during the slow winter season. For this recipe we suggest any combination of potato, sweet potato, onion, leek, rutabaga, parsnip, beet, and sunchoke.

heritage turkey

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

handturkey

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, kicking off the winter holiday season. For us Thanksgiving is about sharing a meal, creating memories with loved ones. We are proud to help you bring friends and family together to celebrate over a feast of rare and heritage breed foods.

At the core of our business we really have you to thank – we wouldn’t have been able to increase our farmer network over the past decade to roughly 80 farmers and artisans. Likewise, the farmers and artisans would not be able to have increased the availability of these rare products to such an extent without your support and commitment. Of the over 51 million turkeys that will be consumed next week, less than 1% are heritage breed. Each year we have increased that percentage and hope to continue to do so so that heritage turkey will be on the table for generations to come.

Standard Bronze Turkey

Heritage / Heirloom

Agriculture began with humans saving and planting seeds and keeping animals. Communities selected traits over generations based on the needs of the culture andRed Wattle landscape. These animals and plants were passed down through generations, continuously improving as mutual dependence between the culture and food deepened.

In this way food is cultural legacy – future generation’s inheritance, kept and passed on.

Merriam-Webster defines Heirloom and Heritage:

Heirloom:
1: a piece of property that descends to the heir as an inseparable part of an inheritance of real property
2: something of special value handed on from one generation to another
3: a horticultural variety that has survived for several generations usually due to the efforts of private individuals

Heritage:
1: property that descends to an heir
2a: something transmitted by or acquired from a predecessor : legacy, inheritance;
2b: tradition
3: something possessed as a result of one’s natural situation or birth : birthright <the nation’s heritage of tolerance>

 

Standard Bronze Turkey

How The Livestock Conservancy defines heritage breed:

Heritage breeds are traditional livestock breeds that were raised by our forefathers. These are the breeds of a bygone era, before industrial agriculture became a mainstream practice. These breeds were carefully selected and bred over time to develop traits that made them well-adapted to the local environment and they thrived under farming practices and cultural conditions that are very different from those found in modern agriculture.

Traditional, historic breeds retain essential attributes for survival and self-sufficiency – fertility, foraging ability, longevity, maternal instincts, ability to mate naturally, and resistance to diseases and parasites.

Heritage animals once roamed the pastures of America’s pastoral landscape, but today these breeds are in danger of extinction. Modern agriculture has changed, causing many of these breeds to fall out of favor. Heritage breeds store a wealth of genetic resources that are important for our future and the future of our agricultural food system.

Seed saving and genetic selection has changed drastically over the past several decades. So fast that law, morality, and popular discourse are struggling toSimmental keep up with the pace of these changes. One aspect of these debates that Heritage Foods USA feels strongly about is sustaining lines of genetic diversity within the food system.

We believe these heritage breeds of livestock are a key to a more sustainable food system and as we say, we must “Eat them to save them”.

Union Square Cafe

A Heritage Chicken Cacciatore Recipe from Union Square Cafe’s Carmen Quagliata!

Union Square Cafe’s Executive Chef and Partner, Carmen Quagliata, is passionate about his native Italian cuisine. Carmen’s culinary style was formed by the Sicilian matriarchs of his family, who made sausage and bread by hand and grew pole beans from seeds carried across the Atlantic by their Italian kin.

Florence Fabricant Loves our Anchovies!

Anchovies from Italy
Photo Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

We are so proud that our anchovies got a mention in Florence Fabricant’s article in the New York Dining section today! Florence Fabricant Loves our Anchovies and we know you will too. We have olive oil and garlic with parsley.  

To Savor: For Connoisseurs of Very Small Fish

Those of us who like our anchovies rich and meaty are often disappointed by the ones sold at many supermarkets; while flavorful, they often tend to be flimsy or skimpy. Carlo Petrini, the founder of Slow Food, is an anchovy aficionado who likes his from Italy, hand-packed in olive oil. These are available for the next few weeks, either plain or seasoned with garlic and parsley: I Sapori del Mare anchovies are $22 for a six-ounce jar from (718) 389-0985 or heritagefoodsusa.com.

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