Tag: Momofuku


3 Eating Animals reviews with quotes

https://variety.com/2018/film/reviews/eating-animals-review-1202845964/

“…it leans, implicitly, toward the pro-meat argument, since the most compelling figures in the film are a handful of heritage farmers who have sidestepped the industrial-farming system to raise their own meticulously cared-for chickens, turkeys, and hogs.

One of them, Frank Reese of Kansas, raises hallowed breeds of poultry that he regards as reverently as an old Italian winemaker does his grapevines. The animals are nurtured and respected, treated as part of the life cycle. Frank’s birds roam free, of course, and eat feed that’s good for them, and Frank talks about the aesthetics of farming, how there’s a “holy” aspect to it. He also says something stark: “There’s no way you can love an animal that’s been genetically engineered to die in six weeks.”

“Christopher Quinn’s documentary makes a persuasive, far-ranging case against factory farming, which it skewers from philosophical, epidemiological and even economic perspectives. Factory farms may make it possible to feed more people, but their environmental effects may make their efficiency a Pyrrhic victory. The movie isn’t even advocating vegetarianism. But it seems impossible to come away from it without wanting to know more about where your meat comes from.”
https://www.vogue.com/article/eating-animals-movie
“In the last 40 or so years, traditional farming—that storied American ideal of the individual farmer who cares for his crop and lives off his land—has quickly lost the battle to industrial farming complexes and factories that produce seemingly endless supplies of meat, eggs, and dairy, harvested from animals who often live in horrific conditions. To call those conditions cruel would be kind—and the film knows as much, highlighting not only what goes on behind closed doors but the stories of the whistleblowers who pay the price for speaking out about it. It is a love letter, too, to the remaining farmers who continue to care for their animals as living, breathing creatures with whom we share the earth.”
Matthew Rudofker

Matt Rudofker – Director of Culinary Operations at Momofuku

Matthew Rudofker joined Momofuku Ssäm Bar as a Sous Chef in 2010 and soon rose to Executive Chef. In 2015 he was also named Executive Chef of Momofuku Má Pêche. Matthew has received a variety of recognition from the hospitality community included in Forbes’ 30 Under 30, Zagat 30 under 30, Eater Young Guns, and James Beard Nominated Rising Star Chef.

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