Tag: registered heritage


Sam Edwards Update: STILL FIGHTING!

Sam Edwards is still fighting two years after a fire savaged his entire facility including his home, his smoke house, and literally thousands of hams. It was an incredible blow to everyone that is part of the chain — Heritage had thousands of hams on hand that Sam would normally smoke and cure, and an entire network of family farmers who depend on Sam’s business every year was left stranded.

But Sam was quick to make partnerships, and a new league of American curemasters stepped up and entered the high-end Heritage ham market with purebred, pasture-raised hams.

Sam is still trying to rebuild — hold ups from lawyers and insurance companies are keeping his hands tied, but plans for a new facility are already on the table, and Sam is working hard with partners across the South to produce the famous Edwards product.

“I spend a lot of time going to Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, checking on our different products with collaborators who are working with our original recipe. I’m thankful for what they are doing for us… It’s not a long-term solution but they are keeping us viable.”

The Edwards hams were more intense before our fire, like the difference between a mild cheese and a sharp cheese…

The one new product to look for is dry-cured Heritage Lamb, hopefully ready for late spring.

“Craig Rogers of Border Spring Farm in VA is providing the lamb… We were rolling it out pre fire, had already tested it and think we found the right recipe and were ready to start shipping when the fire hit, so we are anxious to get that online.”

But the big news is that July is when we’ll be getting to the first batches of new Edwards Surryano Hams that began curing in July of 2017 — the ham that started the revolution.

“After our fire, in 2016, we began sending our hams to a smokehouse in Kentucky to be ready in 2017,” Sam reminds us, “but they burned down in Feb 2017 and we lost 6000 pieces of ham…”

It’s been an incredible battle to get back up and keep on doing it — Sam is a true hero to us, one of our favorite partners, not to mention a damn nice guy. We can’t wait.

The Perfect Heritage Porterhouse

This from our friend and in-house scribe Mike Edison:

“Check out these pics of the perfect Heritage porterhouse chops. This was the biggest one I ever saw, probably about 17 ounces, and two inches thick. I used the method Zack from Carnevino told me about — you gotta cook it in two shots, and even though it is as thick as a phone book, I nailed it, perfect medium in the center, perfect salty crust without incinerating it. Had it with collard greens I wilted in the pork fat and my favorite Rioja which they sell at my local steak house for three times what I get it for at the bottle shop.”

A reminder to all of our friends who want to “nail” a pork chop, Zack Allen at Carnevino says, “We let it come to room temperature, then we cook it to 90 or 100 degrees, just mark it on both sides and sear the fat cap a bit, then we let it rest for as long as we can – it might go up another 10 – 12 degrees just resting. The key is not trying to cook it all at one time. The second time it goes on a higher section of the grill and we finish it off… we get it to our medium rare.”

Mike adds: “Zach’s idea of hitting it twice is brilliant. I cook in an iron skillet and it’s not easy to cook a steak or chop that thick…this is the perfect pork chop hack. I sear it and then finish it in the broiler. Not for nothing, this is the best tip I ever got.”

Help Us Protect the Healthiest, Most Ethical, and Tastiest Meat Available!

Dear Heritage Foods Supporter,

It has been a tremendous year for Heritage Foods, heritage breeds, and heritage farms.

With success comes challenges: Right now there is a movement in the commercial food industry to change the definition of the word “heritage,” and attempt to lay claim to the very thing that has defined us and sustained our farmers since we began selling heritage breeds in 2001.

It’s funny that “heritage,” a word that meant little to big business when we started, is suddenly so appealing.

The definition of “heritage” is simple, and tied to a proud history:

HERITAGE livestock and poultry are purebred genetic lines that can be traced back unchanged to an original herd or flock prior to the beginning of industrial farming.

There is no such thing as a new heritage breed. We understand trendy marketing, but “heritage” means something significant to us, to our farmers, to our customers, and to our industry.

As we look to 2018, we will continue to fight for genuine heritage farms and breeds.

It’s important to remember that when our partner farmers originally decided to raise heritage breeds, they were taking a huge risk. Traditionally, the only established, secure, and reliable sales outlet for farmers was the commodity market — venues like commercial supermarkets and the fast food industry — which pays pennies on the pound for product and demands the very worst of industrial farming protocols just to make a profit.

By committing to heritage breeds and slow, traditional farming practices, our farmers have become entirely dependent on those who understand the value of genuine heritage breeds. Call it community-supported-agriculture, or chef-supported-agriculture if you like, but at its heart Heritage Foods is a network of hardworking American family farmers who believe in your right to the healthiest, most ethical, ecological, and tastiest food imaginable.

By buying certified heritage you can be certain that not one penny goes to industrial farming. Your continued support ensures heritage breeds gain in strength, numbers, and importance in our national dialogue on food.

We are always on the lookout for new and exciting culinary adventures — especially in the charcuterie world and with our oven-ready creations — but our brand is based on time, tradition, history, and respect. That is the true meaning of heritage.

We hope to hear from you early and often in 2018!
Thank you for your support.

Sincerely,

Patrick Martins
Founder

Leftovers!

One of the best things about making big dinners is having leftovers for lunch the next day.

Usually, if we have some steak or lamb left over, it is going into a sandwich. But have you thought about making hash? Lamb hash is a very special treat indeed — just like beef hash all you have to do is chop some potatoes and onions and peppers and have at it (you can always find a recipe online if you don’t feel like free-styling)… with lamb you can add a bit of curry, and it still goes great with eggs or just on its own.

Doing unexpected things with the leftovers is the hallmark of a great chef. Ham sandwiches are great, of course, but how about whipping up a cordon blue? And if that ham has a bone-in, you are looking at the beginning of some great soup.

Here’s an easy tip: pretty much all leftover meat is good on pizza.

Here is another: pretty much all leftover meat is great in a taco.

Leftovers are definitely an art form in themselves. But as ever, it all starts with the ingredients!

The Magic of the Porchetta

The magic of the porchetta, the old-world roast perfected by third generation artisanal butcher Thomas Odermatt, is that it makes everyone look like a genius.

This oven-ready roast is a taste epiphany that only old world techniques can create: skin-on belly is wrapped around the center-cut de-boned loin roast, and generously seasoned throughout. The porchetta is perfectly seasoned with garlic and fresh herbs, and sourced from our elegant, luscious and smooth Berkshire pork. All you have to do is put it in the oven.

Truly, there is not much more to it than that. And then watch your guests ooh-and-ahh over your great taste and magnificent technique!

Let the Turkey do the Talking, and Other Lessons from the Heritage Holiday Table

The story of how your holiday dinner got from the farm to your plate is one of the best you will ever tell. And the truly fantastic part is, it’s all true.

When it comes to Heritage breeds — of pork, of lamb, of beef, you name it — each meal is only the last chapter in a culinary epic. Our Red Wattle pork, for example, comes from pigs that once were staples of New Orleans stockyards and were once nearly extinct as industrial farming took over and cyncically favored only select breeds of genetically engineered pigs. Now Red Wattles are a favorite of knowledgeable pork lovers, saved by aware diners and discerning chefs.

Our Tunis lamb can be traced back to Bible times and were once shepherded by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. The ancestors of the cows that produce our Wagyu steak were originally flown to Texas on the same kind of luxury plane that is favored by touring rock bands.

Not only that, when you are eating Heritage meats you are celebrating biodiversity, supporting family-owned independent farms, and continuing a legacy of traditional American farming that stays far away from antibiotics and hormones and commercial farming practice.

And you can boast that our meat is the very same stuff being prepared at Gramercy Tavern, Del Posto, and some of the best restaurants in NY, LA, and San Francisco, championed by visionary food stars like Alice Waters and Mario Batali!

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